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For Several Months past, I little thought my Dear Friend, that I Should have been the Sunium to Sympathise with you; in the affliction you are call’d to Suffer by the Death of your excellent, and beloved partner, and my Friend, & Relative—Whom from his earliest years, I have loved as a Brother; whose Fathers house in my youth; was a home to me; as my Fathers was to him. Intimately connected,...
After three months Sickness, great part of which time, I expected to go hence & be here no more, I am getting up Some Strength, and returning Rest, has again blessed my Eyes that Sweet “restorer Balmy Sleep,” the best of Physicians to the agitated Nerves and feeble frame, is invigorating me again, and I am enabled to take my pen and acknowledge a Letter long Since received from mr Vanderkemp—...
I always like to send to every one some token of remembrance by writing to each, altho, I á derth of Subjects at the present day will not afford matter for amusement; a Letter upon Literary subjects, is not wanted in a country which abounds in every work of the kind, but as I do not consider, myself capable of being a reviewer—I shall only speak my private opinion, many of the modern writers...
It is So long Since I heard from you that I am anxious to hear from your own pen, how you have got through the winter, and your good Father? For myself, I can Say that but little. I have had a very Sick time, ever since Jan’ry—I have not Sufferd much pain, but a great weakness and debility, like the breaking up of a constitution, never very robust, and very frequently assaild. With the...
I must write you a short Letter, least you Should think yourself neglected, as I have written to both your Brothers, and your Grandfather is so much engaged with his Books that he cannot write to any of his Grandsons now. your Mother writes me word, that you have forgotten your Russian & German Languages. you should not forget, what you learn that is valuable. that is the misfortune of old...
I have already written to you by this vessel. her sailing haveing been delayed, I have the opportunity of acknowledging your Letter dated in Jan’ry, The contents of which are so flattering & complimentary, that I know not how to replie to it.—In the days of my youth, Female Education was very little attended to, in this Country beyond reading, and writing, and Arithmatic. a few rare instances...
I received your note this morning and wish you had known that mr Shaw came out last Evening alone. I looked & looked at noon for him with Some Friend, but they did not come. I asked him why he did not bring you. he said he came of suddenly— The P. never found mr Lymans Note to you untill this moning or he would sooner have commissoned you to thank mr Lyman and Say that he did not think any one...
I embrace the earliest opportunity to congratulate you upon the Birth of a son, and to rejoice with you, in the safety of Mother and child—who I hope may live and prove worthy of his Ancestors—I was writing to your Brother whom I received your Letter, and I communicated to him the agreeable intelligence I should have sent Johns Letter for you to have a read , but I presumed you must have...
Your Letter No 80 December 27th 1815 I have received—Since my last Letter to you, which I think was in Jan’ry, I then wrote to you, under an impression, that it would prove my Last. But it has pleased Heaven to keep me yet longer from the Skies—I cannot Say, but at times, I have felt a regreet, at being like to return again to the world—of which I have, more of a prospect, than for months...
I received a few lines from you to night by mrs Adams; and rejoice in the returning health of your family. as you requested I wrote to you by wednesday post, & inclosed you J A Smiths Letter, and Several others, which I thought you would like to read,—but I find you had not got the Letter when you wrote—William wrote to me, that on the 17 March, (St Patricks day a dear pady) mrs Smith got to...
I attempted to write to you, by Captain Bronson in Jan’ry but my strength failed me, and I have been ever since, in so low, and debilitated a state of Health, as to despair of ever recovering strength again, but for the last ten days, I have gained some, and my physician, encourages me, that I shall be benefitted by the returning Spring. I have not had any disease, such as fever, cough, or...
I received this morning your Note of Sunday and Monday, and am the better for hearing of that your Family are Some of them so; I hope mrs Baileys emetic will not prove so trying to her, as mine was to me. tho only Simple Indian Root, I have Scarcly recoverd the Strength I lost. the very cold night of Sunday and yesterday tried my weak frame, and Shut up my pores so that yesterday I was very...
your Note I received and thank you for it, altho it gave me much anxiety upon your & mrs Bailey’s account. I fear you will lose your dear little Girl, Yet she has youth of her side, and naturally a fine Constitution, but the poor child has had to contend with two diseases, the last of which is shocking from its long continuance—I know by my own confinement how long you have had a very Sick...
I must write you a few lines to day from a Night of Rest, I derive Strength, all lost again by a night of wakefullness—If I do not get to Sleep as soon as I go to Bed, and that is early; it is all lost for the night yet I suffer no pain, except some times in my head. no fever, no cough, yet I was loose my flesh. my complaint seems to be an universal relaxation of the Solids. If I had lived in...
It is a long time since we have received a Line from you at Quincy. I have been so very sick myself, as not to be able to write for several weeks; I am still confined to my chamber very feeble. during this period, I have been, more than once informed that you had been Named for a mission to Russia. While on the one hand, it would give me pleasure to learn that my son was succeeded by so...
I was very sick yesterday, and obliged to take an Emetic, to clear of a quantity of Bile, which the dr said was the occasion of my sleepless Nights. I hope he may be right; for they weaken me much. I was very much worried with it. I took it at half past three, pure delicious Indian Root and it never closed its opperation, until eleven at night. It is slow you know in its opperation. I did not...
I am very anxious to learn whether mrs Smith is confined? I expected the post of this day would have brought me a Letter, but was dissapointed, in hearing either from you, or Caroline—I Should have written to mrs Smith, but I have been little able, for Six weeks to hold a pen, Sometimes I have tremblingly pen’d a few lines to Caroline, to keep her mind at ease. I have not been able to answer a...
your Letter of Nov’br 7th allarmd me when I opend it, and Saw that it was in the hand writing of mrs Adams, and I read with trembling—while I rejoice that you have So able a Substitute, I cannot but regret the occasion for it—your hand may be restored to its use again, but your Eyes have reason to complain that you have used them too hardly. in this instance only—have you been a hard master to...
I know not what to Say of your Letter of the 11 th of Jan. but that it is one of the most consolatory, I ever received. To trace the Commence me nt of the Reformation I Suspect We must go farther back than Borgia , or even than Huss or Wickliff , and I want the Acta Sanctorum to assist me in this Research. That Stupendous Monument of human Hypocricy and Fanaticism the Church of St. Peter
I know you will be glad to see my handwriting, and more so, when I tell you that I have rode out to day as far as the meeting house, and feel the better for it; Sunday night slept very little, and that much disturbed. last night was much easier and slept natural sleep—am very weak— this morg’ Mail brought a Letter from mrs Buckana for you, and Letters from N york from abroad, one from mr A to...
I Abigail Adams wife to the Honble: John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk, by and with his consent, do dispose of the following property. First, that injustice may not be supposed to be done to my Sons, I have conveyed to John Quincy Adams by Deed, all my right and title in the farm given me by my Unckle Norton Quincy valued at $2200, and to my Son Thomas Boylston Adams, all my part,...
Having been attacked this morning with a dangerous Complaint, I have requested Louisa to write you a few lines enclosing a Note, The disposition of which, I wrote you my request, in my last Letter dated December 1815—which Letter, and note, I deliver to Louisa Smith—to keep untill your return— MHi : Adams Papers.
I write again. I am yet among the Living, of which last Monday morning I had no expectation, but thanks to a kind providence I am yet Spaired for Something, and may I be finally found with the wise virgins, my Lamp trimmed. The Severe Snow Storm of yesterday has so Blockaded, the Roads that I know not when they will be passable—no opportunity of sending you Carolines Letter to day, or Letters...
By mr. Tarbel, who left here the last of Nov’br I wrote to you, and to mrs Adams, introducing him to you, as the Grandson of our Ancient, and beloved Friend, dr. Tufts, who then enjoyed his faculties and was active in buisness—but upon the 8th of this month, closed a Life of virtuous usefullness. having finishd the works assignd him, he fell asleepe asleep—for his death was not preeceeded by...
I have lost my dear venerable second Father and ancient Friend, the upright Christian, the noblest work of God, an honest Man—I heard he was unwell on wednesday the P and I went to visit him. he was in his parlour appeard to have a voilent cold, raised freely, but I observed spoke very faintly; and appeard to me at the time, like a Lamp just expiring. I left him, dubious whether I should ever...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...
I thank you my dear Grandson for your very pretty Letter, as you cannot have any remembrance of your Grandparents. it is the more praiseworthy in you, to write to them, and then your hand writeing is so handsome, that it does you honour for your Age. The house which Your Father has taken in the Country, having a Garden full of fruit and vegetables, must be much pleasanter to you, and to your...
Your Letter of Sep’br th 11 came safe to hand, and I was well pleasd With the account you give me of your pursuits. if you give proper attention to each department of your Studies, You cannot Spend much Idle time.—you have improved in your hand writing, and in your composition. Your Mother writes me that you learn fast. I know that you have a capacity to acquire what ever with dilligence you...
you do not know how much your company is desired at Quincy. these long Evening we want much, an addition to our Society. you are so well calculated for retirement, parties not being your prevailing passion. you can sit down and with your Book render the Evenings agreable. I read at the expence of my Eyes. Louisa reads, but wants glasses—Susan some times, but her face pains her if she reads...
Inclosed is a Letter from Charles, by the hand writing. I received it yesterday, with a Letter from Mrs Adams dated 2 October: they were all well then, but I presume mrs Smith gets Letters frequently—I cover the Letter to your Father to you I wrote him one last week and sent to the valley, not recollecting that he might have left it. if he has not received it, you will be So good as to tell...