You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 1-50 of 1,019 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Altho a reluctance to Letter writing grows daily more, and more upon me, your Mothers Letter to your Grandfather, and the communication she made, has aroused me from my S t upor, and calld forth all my sensibility your Youth alone allarms me. I know you to be a prudent discreet and virtuous Child, from principles well founded: which will be a Seenrity to any Gentleman, whom you may favour with...
I wrote to you last week. Our election is over, and Mr. Gerry and Gray undoubtedly elected by a majority of more than two thousand votes. Vermont and New-Hampshire have elected republican Governors. A prodigious revolution in the sentiments and opinions of the people of these States has been effected by the conduct of England and France towards us; but more particularly the shuffling, tricking...
I received pr. post yours of the 17th this day, I shall forward your Letter to the Children. I received a Letter from mrs Johnson of the 12th in which she says mr Cranch’s wounds were healing, that the most dangerous was just below the Hair, the other upon the Side of the head. The Skull was laid bare. The Bravadoes struck him twice after he was sensless upon the Ground, and for no other...
It is So long since I received a Letter from you; that I am anxious to hear from you. I have written twice Since, once before william left us; and once Since. I hope he has arrived in health and Safety; we received his Letter from Albany and heard by way of miss Hinkly, that his visit to Govenour Strong was very pleasing to the Govenour. I feel anxious for him the times are very discourageing...
I know my dear Child I shall wound your affectionate heart when I communicate to you the affliction we are all in, for the loss of our dear little Francis. She Struggled for a Month with the hooping cough, and I flatterd myself that She would get the better of it, but it proved too hard for her delicate Frame & on Wednesday the 24th her pure and spotless Spirit assended to heaven, their to...
I received your letter by Mr. Pintard. Two articles we are much distressed for; the one is bells, but the more important one is wood. Yet you cannot see wood for trees. No arrangement has been made, but by promises never performed, to supply the newcomers with fuel. Of the promises Briesler had received his full share. He had procured nine cords of wood; between six and seven of that was...
Yesterday your father received a letter from William. We rejoice to learn that you are well; and I have the pleasure to inform that we are all getting better, and that I intend to dine below to-day. I congratulate you that the embargo is like to be raised. I hope the non-intercourse bill will be lost; and the merchantmen send out frigates to convoy the trade, molest no one, and defend...
Do you think my Dear Girl, because you are married, that you are to lay asside your pen, and neglect your correspondents? No. No. you ought to be Stimulated to great exertions, for your fancy is now to keep at home, where all your joys and happiness are to center. here you have ample reason to be satisfied, with a partner whose Character, all Tongues, pronounce—Truly Estimable I consider it a...
James got home safe though covered over with mud and dirt, horses and carriage up to their very ears. He got home about 4 oclock on friday. You were led into a sad mistake by Mr Bayard respecting the roads. I traveled them once in a similar state, and therefore have a greater dread of them. I told some members of Congress, that as they were not very usefully employed at present, in order to...
I have been so much engaged that I have not been able to get time to write you a line this week. I have paid some visits to the Secretarie’s ladies, and took tea with them, and one to Mrs. Senator Read, all of which you know by experience takes up time. we had on Thursday 14 couple of young ladies and gentlemen to dine, Bingham, Hares, Whites, Wilsons, Peter’s, Rush’s, Pinckney’s, Breck’s,...
I rejoice to learn by Caroline’s letter to Susan, (which in her absence I took the liberty of opening,) that you had made an excursion to visit a friend. We stand in need of some variety to keep both body and mind in tune. The bountiful Parent of the universe has amply supplied our wants in this respect, by the succession of day and night, of seed time and harvest, of summer and winter, to...
This will be delivered to you, by our friend, Mrs. Smith, who will pass you, on her way to New-York; she is determined to call, and ask you how you are. Since I wrote you last, some changes have taken place. The Secretary of War has resigned, and General Marshal, is nominated in his place. I fear, however, that he will not be prevailed upon to accept the appointment; such times are approaching...
Mr Smith called upon me a few moments this forenoon & brought me your letter of May 9th. I received the favour in due order. General Marshall is nominated Secretary of State, Mr Dexter Secretary of War in lieu of General Marshall promoted, further I say not, sensations of various Kinds will undoubtedly be felt and many reflections no doubt be cast, yet so it is. You Know the resolution has not...
I write you a line this morning to say that dispatches have arrived from our envoys up to April as I understand. I have not seen them. They are just decypherd and will be communicated. No reception of them by the directory. Some conferences with Tallyrand, the Subject as I learn, money. money still—why will our envoys listen to such tales? they will delay & delay, untill the concequences will...
I do not know how our account stands, whether I am indebted for a letter or you, but I shall not be very strict with you; I am always delighted with your letters, whether to me or to Susan; we talk daily of you, and wish for you, and when I think how far you all are from me, I am ready to sit down and weep. We go on much in the old way here—now and then a large party, then a few friends....
I congratulate you upon your safe arrival in Philadelphia the pleasure is enhanced by being unexpected; you would have gratified me by taking a family dinner with me to day: but as you plead fatigue I will request that pleasure tomorrow—Let me know how you are this morning— Yours affectionatly MHi : Smith-Carter Family Papers.
How are you to day? have you heard from weymouth? I send you a Barrel of pears and a Barrel of Russet Apples. if you have them put under your corn House untill the weather freezes they will keep better I also ask your acceptance of a Barrel of Rye flower—I hope I Shall be able to See you tomorrow: I am taking calomil to day—I Send the Linnen and my two Trunks which you have always been So kind...
In return for your polite attention I send you two old News papers, in one of which you will find a Letter of July the 3d which you will notice— I see no papers. If you have any worth sending, it will be charity to forward them / to your Aunt I shall write you more an other time. DLC : Shaw Family Papers.
Received Quincy 9th Feby 1810 of T. B Adams Twenty-five Dolls and fifty Cents in full for One quarter’s interest due upon J Q. Adams’s Note due the first instant. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Here we are Sitting by a good fire in the parlour, and wearing, our winter coats to meeting, whilst our windows are coverd with a profusion of roses, our Wall’s decorated with flowers expanding their Beauties to the cold Northern blast, which rudely lacerates their delicate texture, unmindfull of their Beauty; and headless of their fragrance. I rose the other morning delighted with the visit I...
Through Caroline De Wint, I was last Evening informd that your Mother has had a return of the complaint which so much allarmd Us, when She resided here.—Caroline supposed mr Johnson has or would write to inform us of it. but as we have not received any information from any other quarter, I would fain flatter myself that your Dear Mother is better. I have not acquainted Susan, as I wish much to...
The weather has been so intensely cold for near a Month past that I have not taken a pen or attempted to write a Letter, nor have I acknowledged yours of Janry 15th received a fortnight ago, nor Johns bearing date 1st of Jan’ry. without any snow upon the ground we have had a Month of the coldest weather I recollect to have experienced Since the year your Father and Brother saild for France....
I began a Letter to you on Sunday last in which I informed you that your Sister S. Adams and Abbe arrived here the week before in good health & spirits, that they left your Mother Sisters & Son well. John has written me a Letter by them which is the first I have received from them him, tho he frequently writes to his Grandfather. I shall not fail replying to him. Susan has been a month at...
To cheer the gloom which, in despite of my efforts to dispel, will hang about my heart upon the return of this day, which used to be endeared to me by the presence of your brother, I must have recourse to my pen and write about him, whilst my imagination follows him upon the ocean, sometimes wafted by gentle gales, and sometimes buffeting the winds and the waves. You, too, have your anxieties...
Balance due upon a former re paid Jobe Tinil for a Small trunk Lock and Key for John 1 33 paid Louisa Dexter knitting one pr Socks 25 100 11 30 Received in full 100 5 MHi : Adams Papers.
William has been so punctual in writing to you every week, that I have been more remiss. I cannot write in an Evening; the only time in which I feel a disposition to use my pen is the forenoon. You know how buisily that is generally occupied, and more so now Louisa is in Boston, and the Farm buisness is just commencing. mrs dexter is going to housekeeping. I know not where to supply her place,...
Agreable to your Request we have concluded to Send you the picture. Mr Adams has been So occupied by public Buisness that he has not given any directions respecting it.—but as we know it will receive the greatest care from you; we have concluded to commit it to you; relying upon the promise given, that you will deliver it to our Son John Quincy Adams, when ever he calls for it— With...
I return a subscription paper, which was inclosed to me by your Late much esteemed, and highly respected Father, whose death, no one more Sincerely mourns than I do, as a loss to Learning, to Religion, and to his Country, to all of which he was both an honour and an ornament. With his near and more particuliar connections, I tenderly sympathize, and pray that they may receive comfort, from the...
Inclosed is a paper I promised in a former Letter— I shall not write to Washington untill I get on my journey, but you may write under cover to col Smith, and let me know when the president was in Philadelphia. I do not get any news papers from thence now— Your affectionate / Mother NRU .
Your Letter of Sepbr 25 together with Carolines came safe to hand, but I have been in a kind of Turmoil ever since, and never felt retired, or quiet enough to sit down to my pen. It is a great misfortune to me that I cannot see to write in an Evening, without injury to my Eyes. your Aunt Cranch’s sickness has lain heavey at my heart. She is I hope recovering, but she has been much broken down....
mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
I am indebted to you for two Letters one of the last bearing date Novbr 20th. & 24th. I am always rejoiced to see your handwriting, altho the contents of your Letters some times give me pain, and none more so than those which contain an Idea that your Relatives, and Friends have not exerted themselves for you as they might have done. With respect to william. Your Father himself went to Town:...
The President has a letter from Vanderkemp, in which he proposes to have him send a collection of my letters to publish! A pretty figure I should make. No. No. I have not any ambition to appear in print. Heedless and inaccurate as I am, I have too much vanity to risk my reputation before the public. Printed Source--Letters of Mrs. Adams. Edited by Charles Francis Adams (Boston: 1840)..
I sympathize with you in the loss you have sustained, and rejoice that the event did not prove fatal to the mother, as well as Child. Let me hear from you when you get a Letter from Washington. your affectionate MHi : Adams Papers.
your uncle and I ask the pleasure of mr Greenleafs and your Company to dinner tomorrow. Your Aunt MWA : Adams Papers.
I received yours of the 9th. and thank you for the excellent matter which it contained. Mr Shaw has not sent you any papers from hence because the papers have not been worth transmitting, a tupor appears to have seized every person and the query what can be done? what will be done? what ought to be done? seems to be the questions, amongst the three parties, into which not only the Legislature...
Received Quincy August 7th: 1810 of Thomas B Adams the sum of twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for one Quarter’s interest in J Q Adams’s Note of hand. $25:50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Inclosed are the Letters by this days post Saturday—Tell William I received his from Worster this morning. all well but James who must needs go a Girl hunting before he recoverd from mumps, So is sick with a fever but if he cannot come on I Shall take peter, and leave him to repent of his folly Yours as ever MHi : Adams Papers.
my Son J Q Adams has an opportunity of employing the Sum I have which is payd of Eight pr Cent Stock. will you be so good as to draw Such an order as will enable him to receive it, and inclose it to me I Shall go to Town tomorrow he will leave Boston on monday DNDAR .
I have not had a line from you for several weeks. Your father visits the post-office every post day; and, although he frequently returns with his pockets full of letters, I do not find among them the superscription which is dearer to me than all the rest. You must know, since he has publicly avowed himself the father of the whole nation , he has a most prodigious number of letters from his...
The card presented me by your Committee communicating the result of the test by Small pox of 12 children vacinated under your direction must was highly gratifying to every Friend of Humanity me as it must be to every Friend of humanity and the exertions you gentlemen have made to promote and extend So valuable a discovery are highly honorable to you as men, and as Christians assimilating you...
Quincy November 13th: 1813 Recd: of Thomas B Adams the sum of Twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for One quarter’s Interest due on J Q Adams Esqr Note, the first instant. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
I took my pen to write to you this morning in a placid temper of mind; the news papers of yesterday lay by me, which I had not lookd into comeing late last evening from Boston: papers bearing the title of Federal. I found in them such a bitter Spirit of Party, such uncandid constructions, such false conclusion and, such mean crinching to one power, and such bigg Blustering against an other,...
I have not written you for several days, you will easily suppose my time much occupied by having Mrs Johnson, & now our Boston friends here and making preparation to go away. Mrs Johnson will go tomorrow or Tuesday. Mrs Smith on Friday. Thursday will be my last public dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens can tell you what a crowd we had on friday evening. The rooms and entry were full, and so hot as...
Coll. Bradford came out to day with a card of invitation from the Govenour, and an other from the Govr and Senate requesting your Father to celebrate the fourth of july with them, he has accepted the invitation. if you receive an invitation, both your Father and I advise you to accept it. if you do not, I shall depend upon the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy with Mrs Adams Kitty & the...
I heard last Evening of the melancholy event, and sincerely sympathize with the afflicted family I send you some peices of crape they are rusty, but the best we have. if you attend the funeral, and want a Bonnet, if mine will answer and my crape cloak they are at your service—I intended to have asked You here to day to have past it, with mrs Cushing and Caroline, but a melancholy duty calls...
Received Quincy July 27th 1809 of John Q Adams Esqr the sum of fifty-three Dollars and twelve Cents, in full for interest on $1700 from the 18th: January to the 7th August 1809. $53.12 MHi : Adams Papers.
I Send your Mother a Bottle of Hermitage wine which on Serching the cellar we found. I hope it will prove a cordial to her. it is more mild than port, and excellent for herI pray it may be blest to her restoration MWA : Adams Papers.
Do you know how long a time has elapsed since you wrote a single line to your Mother? You did not use to be thus neglectfull of your pen: I am myself frequently tardy, but I believe unless the post has failed: that I have written twice, Since I recieved a Letter from you. Caroline has written once to me: and once to Susan so that my mind has been releived from the apprehension that you were...
Received Quincy March 4th 1814 of Thomas B Adams Esqr Twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for one quarter’s interest on J Q Adams’s Note $ 25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.