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We have lost an excellent Neighbour and Friend in the death of Mr Black, for more than a Year he has Sufferd great bodily disease but for the last Month, a fever in concequence of his other complaints Seizd upon him, and put a period to his days—he was patient and resignd, and like a good Man who has better hopes beyond the grave, Cheerfull and pleasant to his last tour . Thus have two of my...
I have been from Quincy more than five weeks, and have received only one Letter from any Friend Since I left them; I find however that you have not been unmindfull of us. the fish arrived Safe and we regaled ourself with it, mr and mr. otis joining in the commemoration of the good things of New England Poultry we have here, both cheeper and in better order than our markets produce it, but the...
How have your Lungs borne this severe cold weather? mine have hitherto sustaind it better than the last winter, but we have advanced only a little way yet. The Barn is compleated and the accounts all payed, the amount 920 Dollars. 4ct. there is some timber & stuff amounting to about 15 dollars included in the amount which is thought best to leave for repairs to the old Barn Mr Foster had some...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
I mourn with you the loss of Dr Maize. he was an amiable Man, and a skilfull Physician—Of how many valuable lifes Lives has this destroying pestilence deprived Society—and when it is to end, god only knows— I thank you for the papers—particuliarly that which contains the peice addrest to Cooper. I know the writer. few Such peices now adorn the page of a Gazzet, which has lost all its...
This Letter will be deliverd to you by your son whom you will find improved in his Health, greatly I think—the weather has been so very bad and the Roads almost impassiable since his return, so that it has not been practicable to make you an earlier visit. I have been very anxious for your dear little Girl, whom I have frequently heard an unfavourable account of, but miss Palmers last Letter...
I thank you for your Letter by your Aunt. altho you have not written to me before, I know you have often thought of me, and you are so constant & regular a correspondent with your Grandfather that I readily exculpate You from all neglect. I read your Letters to him with pleasure. they show a mind desirous of information, & solisitious for the truth. it is knowledge which inspires caution, as...
Shall we ever have the pleasure of a visit from you at Quincy. I can Scarcly credit that you Should be so intirely weaned from a place, and Friends whom you once loved and esteemed. I know your avocations are numerous—your time fully occupied, but you may have leisure to visit the Atheneum, when your Friends here are to be no more seen. your uncle and Aunt Cranch have both been very sick. your...
I write you only a few lines, because I am not in Spirits this morning to do more; I am Sadly afflicted with sleepless Nights, yet I have not been, either to Balls drawing Rooms plays or even to Boston, but So it is that I get not more than one Nights Sleep in the course of 5 or 6. I am not otherways sick, a little fretting fever and agitation of Nerves—enough of myself without it was better....
Least you Should not See many of the curiosities produced in the Aurora; I Shall now and then inclose you a choice morsal; in this, which I now forward you you will find a Letter Said to have been written by a mr Crammond of this City, to mr Parish the former Consul at Hamburgh and printed in a Paris paper. mr Crammond is a respectable English merchant of this City, but by no means a...
I am indebted to you for a very kind and friendly Letter by my son to which I ought Sooner to have replied, but I have been a poor correspondent for the last nine Months, through loss of Sleep My Head for more than half the time has felt in such a State of Langour and weakness that I have not been able either to write or read with comfort or Satisfaction. you who was witness to my Situation...
I ought to have written to you before this day and have informed you of my Safe return home. benefitid by my excursion—on fryday I left Haverhill and went on to Newbury port, where I was kindly received and hospitably entertaind by mrs Coombs and family: my cold became less troublesome, and on Saturday morning we Sat our faces homeward. the morning was cloudy, and warm. we proceeded Slowly,...
The extreem heat of yesterday & the no less prospect of it this day, is beyond any thing I ever experienced in my Life. The Glasses were at 90 in the Shade Yesterday. tomorrow will be the 4 July, when if possible I must see thousands. I know not how it will be possible to get through. live here I cannot an other week unless a Change takes place in the weather. You had as good be in an oven the...
I know my much loved Sister that you will mingle in my sorrow, and weep with me over the Grave of a poor unhappy child who cannot now add an other pang to those which have peirced my Heart for Several years past; cut off in the midst of his days, his years are numberd and finished; I hope my Supplications to heaven for him, that he might find mercy from his maker, may not have been in vain....
I write you a few lines by mr Black altho I know the post will go quicker. I hope to get Letters to day from Quincy, now a week since I heard. we are thank God all well. the President is most worn down I tell the Gentlemen if they do not give him a respit Soon it will be too much for him—the Numurous addresses which pour in daily in abundance give him much additional writing. They are however...
I received on Saturday your kind favour of Febry. accept my thanks for the orations. I send you in return Major Jacksons, which was very handsomely deliverd, and is as highly spoken of as any amongst the multitude. I think it will not lose by a comparison with any which I have read, and I already have enough for a volm. Messengers is the wildest Raphosody of any I do not esteem the whole; more...
I know not what may be the temper of the National Legislature respecting the Honey words of the Great Nation our state Legislature, and I believe the people in general consider them like the Book of the prophet, tho Sweet in the mouth bitter in the Stomack : a Lady should not use the other word. You must be gratified with the Report of the Senate and House upon the Virgina & Kentucky Treason,...
I reachd this place yesterday morning and found Mrs Smith and Caroline very well. Mrs Adams and her two little Girls have been here three weeks. N York still distressd with the fever, tho many of the inhabitants have returned to the city, yet several of them have fallen since, and from the return of so many persons, new cases have been increased. I found a Letter from the President who writes,...
I received your kind Letter of Janry and intended writing you yesterday, but I know not how it is, I have less time for writing than formerly. I believe it is partly oweing to my not being able to improve the Morning as I used to. When I can sleep I indulge myself more, as it is not light enough to See to write till after Seven oclock. Our Weather is too warm. we shall have a Sickly Spring....
Inclosed are two Letters which I received last evening with a Letter from your Brother Uncle , and your Aunt Sister , to me. his bears date 17 july. he Says the Commercial Treaty was signd the 3d of this Month, and that mr Gallatin and Clay have Saild for Nyork with it. it is only for four years duration. His Situation in England is not like to be very agreable, either to him or to her; and he...
I suppose the reason why I have not had a Letter from you for a long time, arrises from your expectation that I am upon my Journey; the Roads have been represented to me as so intolerable bad, and I know them to be so, that I have been prevaild upon to remain longer than I designd. I now think I shall stay untill after the 13th of Feby, the great important day which may in its concequences...
I received your very excellent Letter they are all of which are very previous to me. I know your avocations & your necessary anxiety on account of the deranged Health of my dear Neice, Whom I pray God to restore. I know your feeling are sufficiently alive. I will not add to them by any observations of mine . my Heart sympathizes with you, let that suffice, we will look to the Ruler of the...
Mr Brooks calld and left the Letter from you and mr Adams’s papers from dr Welch excepting Receits of which there are none, but dr Tufts will now attend to his affairs and pay the assesments as soon as he can come to Town. I cannot rest through the day, without Sending to know if you can give me any information, respecting Thomas. mr Brooks informed me last Evening that the Barbara was cast...
Altho I cannot personally be with you, oweing to the Sickness in my own Family, to pay the last tribute of respect to the remains of your Dear Departed Son, be assured my dear afflicted Friends, that my Heart, my Thoughts, and my affections are with you, and that I do most tenderly Sympathize with you in this day of your visitation May that all Mercifull Being, whose ways are not as our ways,...
To know that your Mother has been Sick of a dangerous fever, and that She is Still in a low weaks State, and that you have not been to see her, gives me pain, and must Sensibly affect her. you that possess a Heart and mind Sensibly alive to every benevolent feeling cannot possibly be wanting in that fillial tenderness, and affection So justly due to one of the best of parents. Speedily...
I received your Letter written upon the Birth-day of my only daughter, and memorable to me for that occasion, as well as the Eleventh of the Same Month upon which was Born J Q Adams, and a Sister whom I lost, and whom no doubt you recollect from the circumstances attending it, for you were with me. so much for Egotism. now I will replie to your queries. in the first place, I have the pleasure...
your Letter of july 26th has lain by me unanswerd untill now. your own mind will easily suggest to you the multiplied cares and anxieties through which I have passt since that date and plead my excuse.— the destination of my dear son and family to a foreign country, at this period of the lives, of both his Father and Mother has been a trial to us of the most a most painfull & tender kind we...
I write you this morning just to say that there are dispatches from our Envoys up to April by which it appears that they have had Several conferences with Tallyrand, the Subject of which was obtaining Money—They are just decypherd and will be communicated. no Reception from the Directory, no like to be any. I can not but Say to you, what will Strike every one, that every hour they remain in...
The Bill which Our Tennant has presented must I presume be allowd him: the repairs were necessary I have not any doubt. he ought not however to do these things without consulting us. have you leazed him the place an other Year? does he comply with the terms of his lease? I wish you to keep the Rent you receive always Seperate from any other Charges. I have devoted it the years past to the...
I received yours of the 11th. I think Thomas Welch should take his degree at College before he goes. I hope to be in Boston in July. If any vessel should be going to Hamburgh, it would be best for him to embark for that port. I sincerely regret that you have had an other vessel captured. Captain Brooks is destined to it, it should seem, from his having so often sufferd, but the President says...