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Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
I expected to have heard from you by Mr Beal, but his comeing to dine yesterday with the club I presume prevented, the Snow has left us so far that we went in the carriage to meeting to day. We are all well, and wish to see you Dexter was in Town one day. I directed him to call, but he said the Town was so full, and so crouded that he could not leave his team; does mr Adams intend comeing out...
It was not untill Saturday morning when I went to See my poor old domestic Pheby, that I learnt a word respecting my dear little Elizabeths Sickness—I carried up Abigail with to See you Supposing you had returnd, too much fatigued to call in the Evening. Inda then informd me that She heard by mr Saxon that She was very Sick. you may easily imagine how anxious I was untill mr Adams returnd in...
Mrs Dexter went on Sunday morning to your House, as she promissed me she would on Saturday. the Children all dined with me on Sunday— I have had such a Succession of company yesterday and to day that I have not been able to get out untill this Evening, when I went up to See the children and found them all happy and at play, mrs Dexter at her spining wheel—I read her that part of your Letter...
I will write you a line the first I have attempted, to tell you I am getting better I hope tho very slowly. I am very weak, and not a little anxious to hear how my dear Abigail is. sick as I have been I regret that she is from home, tho I doubt not you will receive every attention and kindness, but you must das assistance, and have a home, more particularly so in Sickness—as soon as you think...
Having finishd my Farm House avocations I sit down to inquire how you are, and how my dear little Girl is after your journey. the fog of the morning I feard would prevent your Sitting out early, and make it late before you reachd the much longed for paternal Habitation. I could enter into all your sensations upon approaching it, and meeting again a kind and affectionate Mother after a long...
I rode up to your house this morning to inquire how the Children were and heard that they were both well. dexter Slept there last night. I will Send George in with the chaise tomorrow, if mr Adams returns. George may come out in the Stage. If there Should be any Salmon to be had tomorrow and mr Foster would get me part of one, I will be much obliged to him—I should not like to give more than a...
I Sit down to thank you for your Letter yesterday received by the post, and to Say that I was much rejoiced to find you and my Son, in improved health & Spirits, and at the Same time to Say to you that, your Children are well. Thomas my particular Charge is very well and as good a Boy as I wish— gives me no trouble—Hull is finely—I have heard from him every day, and been twice to See him, and...
Miss Ann Beal deliverd me your Letter this morning at meeting. you will see by my Letter of fryday Evening how much the President was dissapointed both by the travelling and weather. we adjournd the club on purpose. to day the travelling is better than since the snow fell. I have lookd up the articles you requested, and judging others by myself, that a kind turn will not be considerd as a...
we have not washd this week. I hope mr Adams has things enough. if the weather Should be good I can Send him Some on wednesday, if you can send me word whether he wants them—and he will also let me know when to Send the Horse and chaise for you—Sister cranch is better than she was She looks quite paled down. My Love to your Sister / from / your affectionate / Mother thank miss white for the...