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Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
I expected to have heard from you by Mr Beal, but his comeing to dine yesterday with the club I presume prevented, the Snow has left us so far that we went in the carriage to meeting to day. We are all well, and wish to see you Dexter was in Town one day. I directed him to call, but he said the Town was so full, and so crouded that he could not leave his team; does mr Adams intend comeing out...
It was not untill Saturday morning when I went to See my poor old domestic Pheby, that I learnt a word respecting my dear little Elizabeths Sickness—I carried up Abigail with to See you Supposing you had returnd, too much fatigued to call in the Evening. Inda then informd me that She heard by mr Saxon that She was very Sick. you may easily imagine how anxious I was untill mr Adams returnd in...
Mrs Dexter went on Sunday morning to your House, as she promissed me she would on Saturday. the Children all dined with me on Sunday— I have had such a Succession of company yesterday and to day that I have not been able to get out untill this Evening, when I went up to See the children and found them all happy and at play, mrs Dexter at her spining wheel—I read her that part of your Letter...
I will write you a line the first I have attempted, to tell you I am getting better I hope tho very slowly. I am very weak, and not a little anxious to hear how my dear Abigail is. sick as I have been I regret that she is from home, tho I doubt not you will receive every attention and kindness, but you must das assistance, and have a home, more particularly so in Sickness—as soon as you think...
Having finishd my Farm House avocations I sit down to inquire how you are, and how my dear little Girl is after your journey. the fog of the morning I feard would prevent your Sitting out early, and make it late before you reachd the much longed for paternal Habitation. I could enter into all your sensations upon approaching it, and meeting again a kind and affectionate Mother after a long...
I rode up to your house this morning to inquire how the Children were and heard that they were both well. dexter Slept there last night. I will Send George in with the chaise tomorrow, if mr Adams returns. George may come out in the Stage. If there Should be any Salmon to be had tomorrow and mr Foster would get me part of one, I will be much obliged to him—I should not like to give more than a...
I Sit down to thank you for your Letter yesterday received by the post, and to Say that I was much rejoiced to find you and my Son, in improved health & Spirits, and at the Same time to Say to you that, your Children are well. Thomas my particular Charge is very well and as good a Boy as I wish— gives me no trouble—Hull is finely—I have heard from him every day, and been twice to See him, and...
Miss Ann Beal deliverd me your Letter this morning at meeting. you will see by my Letter of fryday Evening how much the President was dissapointed both by the travelling and weather. we adjournd the club on purpose. to day the travelling is better than since the snow fell. I have lookd up the articles you requested, and judging others by myself, that a kind turn will not be considerd as a...
we have not washd this week. I hope mr Adams has things enough. if the weather Should be good I can Send him Some on wednesday, if you can send me word whether he wants them—and he will also let me know when to Send the Horse and chaise for you—Sister cranch is better than she was She looks quite paled down. My Love to your Sister / from / your affectionate / Mother thank miss white for the...
I received your Letter of 17th of the last Evening and rejoiced with trembling. Dr Hoolbrook thought if Dear Child lived over that day, there would be hopes of he . I pray heaven it may be so, for all our Sakes— but arly for her afflicted parents. I never Saw greater distress My dear Sons when he came to See us, the night he left her for Haverhill; he had Struggled to conquer his feelings &...
I thank you my dear Grandson for your very pretty Letter, as you cannot have any remembrance of your Grandparents. it is the more praiseworthy in you, to write to them, and then your hand writeing is so handsome, that it does you honour for your Age. The house which Your Father has taken in the Country, having a Garden full of fruit and vegetables, must be much pleasanter to you, and to your...
A seperate Letter my dear Child is due to you, not only as a reply, to one which you have written me, for which I thank you! but to assure you; that the improvements you have made, in your hand writing; and composition, have given me great pleasure. and also to congratulate you upon the arrival of your two Brothers in England, towards whom I hope you will find yourself allied, not only by the...
I have received two very pretty Letters from you, with which I have been much pleased, both with the composition, and the hand writing. I should long ago, have written to you if I had known how to have conveyd my Letter to you! I think much about you, and your Mother, Since your Father left you, and more, Since your uncle and Aunt Smith; and your dear little Cousin have all come away I think...
I must write you a short Letter, least you Should think yourself neglected, as I have written to both your Brothers, and your Grandfather is so much engaged with his Books that he cannot write to any of his Grandsons now. your Mother writes me word, that you have forgotten your Russian & German Languages. you should not forget, what you learn that is valuable. that is the misfortune of old...
My Grandaughter The present Mrs. Treadway availed herself of your kind invitation to make you a visit, and her Friend miss Tracy, Sensible of the advantage Young people derive from mixing with those whose example and Manners ornament and improve, whilst they delight and Churm Charm those Susceptable of improvement. I consented to Susan earnest desire of passing a little time from home. her...
This is the House that Jack built And this is the curse that lay in the House &c Now George, I hear you Say, what in the world can Grandmother mean by this? why I am so joyfull, that I must Sport a little with you—but to explain, upon the 29th of June, arrived the Ship pacific at N york, from Liverpool 45 days passage and She brought news of the arrival at that place of the New packet from...
I thank you my dear George for your Letter. I was glad to learn that you had such an agreable Ride to Atkinson, and that the objects of Nature presented themselves in Such pleasing coulours to you The contemplation of nature, and its history fills the mind with the greatest variety of Ideas, and never brings weariness or disgust, and as an Elegant writer expresses it “The Study of Nature like...
I received your importent Letter so clearly exprest that for some time I was not able to define the true meaning of it. with the assistance of cousin Caroline, I finally discovered that you have a peice to speak at the approaching exhibition and that you thought the coat you had, was too short to appear in, and that the piece you had to deliver, would appear much better delivered in a more...
with this Letter I inclose to you a list of those Letters which I have received from you, with their numbers and dates. I am sorry to learn that you suffer from ill health. I would have you refrain from the use of the flute, while that is the case. it is very injurious to the Lungs while the Body is weak. You Should rise early; and ride on Horse Back previous to going to your studies. your...
I was much pleased with the improvement of in your hand writing. I have had to regret all my Life time the want of that accomplishment. when I was young, I was brought up in a Town where it was at that time, customary for Girls to attend Schools for writing, and female Education was much less attended to than at the present day; indeed it was almost wholy neglected—when you get a little...
I received this day a Letter from your father dated 21 Sep’br. it was a Letter different from any which I have before received from him.—it communicated to me, and to you the sorrowfull intelligence of the Death of your dear and only Sister. She was taken Sick in August, and died the 15th of Seb’br with a nervous fever which brought on convulsions your parents are in great affliction as you...
It is better to go to the House of mourning than to the House of Feasting, or dancing, for the living lay it to heart. you my dear Children are now calld to the House of mourning and Sorrow, by the death of your dear Aunt Smith and the only daughter of your Grandparents, the only Sister of your Father. your Aunt died last night, to the deep affliction of the whole Family—her pure Spirit I...
I have received your Letter written at Sea dated the 1st of May, and was pleased that you had kept your promise of writing to me, and I hope you will continue to inform me of what you see in your Tour, which you have marked out, in your Letter, when you tread upon the ground where Shakespear was born You will naturaly feel a veneration for the Spot, and wish for some spark of his genius. when...
I should sooner have acknowledgd your obliging favour & replied to your inquiries but I was if I coud have obtaind any thing upon the Subject which woud have been usefull to you The President desires me to tell you that he does not possess any minutes or details of the debate or Speech upon the occasion you allude to. Dr Ramsey must have his from some lose memmorandum or other. With respect to...
I have received your Letters of the 24 & 28 of Jan’ry. if you continue in the use of so many learned words—you must send a dictionary explanatory of them. When you talk of your solitude I fully Comprehend that, and commisirate you in it. I hope you have not Sleepless Nights added to your other torments. I cannot reconcile myself to the Idea of Thomass setling in philadelphia. I Shall try to...
upon the 12th, our dear Thomas reachd Quincy to my no small Joy! I am as happy in his company and Society, as you have been before me, and I bless God that he has returnd to his Native Country an honest sober and virtuous citizen. I hope he will continue an honour and a comfort to his parent’s tho it is allotted them to experience different Sensations with respect to one, of whose reformation...
I reachd this place yesterday about 11 oclock and found the Family all well the Col. with his Regiment gone to the Jersies.—Mrs. Smith and Nancy reachd here on fryday from Baltimore, the fever still so bad in N York, that it is not adviseable to go in. We had two very frosty nights upon our Journey, some fogs. I took some cold. Mr. Otis a very bad one. I left him & family at Mrs. Hatens, about...
we reachd this place at half after Six we found the old inhabitants gone, the new inn keepers name Tombes, the people civil and obligeing, every thing very neat Jackson drove very well. Farmer and Favorite lazy Traveller & ceasar brisk I am fully of the mind that a middle Size Horse travels with more ease to himself, and pleasure to the driver. we shall get on Slowly. I had rather have the...
I received your Letter of Jan’ry 10th last Evening by mr Black when he returnd from Town, with one from William and the news papers. If I could but hear that Thomas was Safe arrived, I Should not dispute the presidene of first visit from him. I presume he would have no hesitation in detemining where it ought first to be made. Every circumstance will certainly lead him to Philadelphia, being...