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Your neat, pretty letter, looking small, but containing much, reached me this day. I have a good mind to give you the journal of the day. Six o’clock. Rose, and, in imitation of his Britannic Majesty, kindled my own fire. Went to the stairs, as usual, to summon George and Charles. Returned to my chamber, dressed myself. No one stirred. Called a second time, with voice a little raised. Seven...
keep yourself quiet. caroline will come Shortly, and then be sure you shall have a carrier after you, but I do not look for her, untill I learn that She is come to Nyork—I return your Letter and request that you would come up Say thursday or fryday and bring mr Hinkly with you to eat some Strawberries fresh from the vines. my best Love to Your good Mother and pray her to take a kind...
At last it is decided—it is as I conjectured in my last Letter to you, the Situation of Mrs Adams prevents their return to America this Season, and obliges mr Adams to decline his Appointment as Judge. I have received from him Several Letters of an old date Since I last wrote to you, but it was not untill yesterday that I received a Letter from my Grandson William Smith, of June 25th in which...
I wrote to you intending to end the Letter by mr Dexter, but found he was gone. I therefore committed it to the post under cover to mr Smith as the Letter had 200 dollers in it. be so good as to inform me by mrs Cranch when it reaches you I received yesterday yours of Feb’ry 25th. I think the sooner the Building is begun the better and as many hands employd as can be usefull in forwarding it....
mr Clark will deliver you this Susan has a Letter from her Mother urgeing her to come to See her, and consenting to her.… which I cannot under present circumstances—so they say no more to me—I think with you that it will be best for them to go Silently and if a female travelling companion can be found at the Same time it will be more agreable—fine weather for your Father & Sister Mr C will...
I wrote you in my last how much I was dissapointed in not being able to visit you my dear Sister, but if I had not been obliged to have prepared for my Journey the Situation of our dear Sister and family, as well as of my own would have prevented me, tho a kind providence has preserved the Life of our Sister hitherto, and restored mrs Norten to our prayers, So far as to give us hopes of her...
I am indebted to you for two Letters one of the last bearing date Novbr 20th. & 24th. I am always rejoiced to see your handwriting, altho the contents of your Letters some times give me pain, and none more so than those which contain an Idea that your Relatives, and Friends have not exerted themselves for you as they might have done. With respect to william. Your Father himself went to Town:...
It is now near three Months since I left the city of Washington; in all which time I have not received a line from you; I do not mention this with the spirit of accusation, for I have been equally culpable; that I have written to you however, the letter which lies unsent, before me will testify. It is now of too old a date to make a journey of 500 miles; and I reassume my pen to inquire after...
Your Letter of Jan’ry 6 I received last Evening. your Children are very well, and very well taken care of. so do not give yourself any anxious solisitude about them. I believe they are much better off than they could have been at any boarding House in washington, where they must have been confined in some degree; or have mixd with improper persons; with respect to John, the Child enjoys...
It was with great pleasure that I received and read your Letter of August 6th from Ealing, and it communicated to me a double portion of delight, as it appeard to be the emanation of a mind more at ease, than you experienced in that cold dark region of Russia—Altho the climate of G Britain is much more humid than that of America, and you can never as the proverb, says praise a fair day, untill...