You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Abigail Smith

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith"
Results 31-60 of 1,019 sorted by date (descending)
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
When President Munroe was upon his Tour Surrounded by the Military, encompassed by Citizens, harased by invitations to parties—and applications innumerable for office—Some Gentleman asked him if he was not compleatly worn out with fatigue —to which he replied—o No—a little flattery will Support a man through great fatigue—I may apply the observation to myself and Say that the flattery in your...
The President has a letter from Vanderkemp, in which he proposes to have him send a collection of my letters to publish! A pretty figure I should make. No. No. I have not any ambition to appear in print. Heedless and inaccurate as I am, I have too much vanity to risk my reputation before the public. Printed Source--Letters of Mrs. Adams. Edited by Charles Francis Adams (Boston: 1840)..
Upon taking up your Register the other day, a communication respecting drawing rooms, attracted my attention. Your correspondent must have been misinformed when he states, that there was any distinction of party made at the drawing room while I had the honor to preside there; any gentleman or lady, of either party, who chose to visit there, were received with equal civility. And from your...
I this morning received Your Second Letter, by way of journal. we have all been highly entertaind. it makes me a Sharer with you, in your various occupations—brings me acquainted with Characters, and places me at your fire Side. one Single Letter conveys more information in this way, than I could obtain in a whole Session of Congress.—I hope you will continue this method altho you will receive...
I received last Evening the Calico & your Bill, in which I find Several mistakes which I Shall point out as I proceed. when you purchased me the Bombazet, I enclosed ten dollars. You bought me 7 yd 2 Skeins of Silk Some linen, one pound Tea 6 pd currents & 3 pd of coffe, the last of which I took tho I did not Send for it. all these articles of Groceries you have omitted in Your Bill—I then...
enclosed is Harriets account which I wish you to Settle when you go to Town. I have had it some time She received 15 dollers of you—Your Father has a Bill to pay to mr Cary—and the marble chimney peice is to be included—Both amount to 28 dollars.—I have his Bill. I beleive there is some money due in B office I presume there is also something due in Philadelphia, and as we can get flower here...
As you accused me last Evening, or rather Night with preventing the Ladies from writing to you; I apologized by saying that I had a Letter written to you at home,which was really the case. I made a Fairy visit to Washington last night, in which time I visited mrs Munroe, mrs Madison &c, and meeting you and mrs Adams in the street, in fine Health and Spirits, you accosted me as above—I was too...
I have been haunted with the Deamon of omission, and a hundred Sprights in the garb of excuses, Such as Company, family avocations Noisy Boys &c &c This morning, being very Stormy, I determined to expel them all, and commence writing a Letter to you. I beleive I had promised to write to my Son. I know that he must be so enveloped in publick Buisness, that he can ill afford time to attend to...
The moon shone so bright this morning that I rose, as it seems while it was yet Night, and allotted a portion to my Maidens, & set my whole house hold in motion, for you must know that we have Six Men at this day, three ladies, who love us so dearly that they must stay. a cold winter comeing & no Home, and wish the old Gentleman was but 25—I had a specimin of a compliment this morning from one...
I known you are fast asleep while I have kindled my own fire in my chamber calld my men and maidens and am sit down in the parlour to write much to brag of at 73. but then I cannot see to thread my needle, nor sew quick nor go here & there as I could in days past, but then I have better health, and in general good Spirits. always endeavouring to look upon the bright side without Gloomy...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
I return Carolines Letter with thanks and rejoice to learn that she & the Family arrived safe after their Quixot expedition, in which I think Caroline risked her own Life & that of her child—tho while she was here I did not like to tell her so. She certainly made too free with her Health & constitution as her appearence showed— I have a commission from mrs dexter rather I should say petition....
A long period has elapsed since I addrest a line to you—I have not taken my pen for three weeks—I have been so constantly occupied with my visitors, and a sick domestic, who has been near dieing with a Billious fever the whole time my Friends were with me, that I could not find a leisure moment. mr & mrs DeWint his Mother their children and servants left us last week, about the time when...
mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
I will not let so good an opportunity pass without writing you a few Lines, to inquire after your Health, and to rejoice with you upon the return of your Sister, and Family to America, in good health, and with a more youthfull countanance than when She left us—but like Birds of passage, they left us, in one month for Washington— your three Nephews are with us George who has grown to the...
Welcome home again—I received by mrs Adams your Note, and Carolines, the Same Mail brought me a Letter from Susan of the 7th from utica, saying that the Carriage was at the door waiting to convey them to Albany, from thence they should proceed to Fishkill—and I suppose would arrive there just about the time Caroline intended Setting out. which may retard them a day or two—I hope however if...
The president has thought it Safe for the Students to assemble at Cambridge upon fryday last, and George has followd yesterday. we Shall miss his Society much. he has been company for his Grandfather Since Louissa has been Sick—I hope he is properly imprest, with the necessity of arduous application—John and Charles appear to like their Preceptor very well and perform their lessons I am told,...
I am indebted to you, for two very kind Letters The first, was written after my Grandaughter miss de Wint, had made you a visit. I ought to have inform’d you, how much She regreted, that it was not in her power to repeat it, and writing to me upon her return, that She was gratified in having visited a Lady, whom She knew; was much esteemd by her Grand Parents: as well as by her own Father, and...
while I congratulate dear Caroline upon the Birth of a daughter, I am calld to mourn with her Brother, upon the loss of a son. mr Adams writes me, that he found them in great affliction He is with mr & mrs Fry—expecting to get to Housekeeping by the first of this month. He is entering upon the Duties of his office, with fear and trembling. His Eyes and his right Hand threaten to fail him, and...
you will I know excuse my not haveing written to you more than once; when you learn the additional care and anxiety I have had in my Family by the Sickness of Louisa, who has had two other allarming attacks of pukeing blood, more than half a pint each time, and a much larger quantity passing down. She is much reduced, and for several days unable to leave her Bed—She is now able to sit up...
I heard of you at Providence from mr Fearno , and I was yesterday informd that the News paper reported your arrival at N york on Saturday. I hope tomorrows Mail will give me Some direct intelligence as the two or three first days of your journey the weather was very oppressive, I fear you must have endured great fatigue. By this time I hope you are compensated for it, by the happy meeting of...
I received your Letter by mr Beals, and was very glad to learn that you and your Brother had enterd School you will very soon get familiar with it, and if you do as well as you know how, you will not be behind your Class. If Charles is really unwell; mrs Welsh will give him something to take, and he must restrain his appetite which was too keen for the season of the Year. I would have you call...
By a Letter which I received from Caroline dated 1st Sepbr She acquaints me that a mr Verplanck has a Letter of introduction from mr dewint to you, and that She wishes him to come to Quincy to See us, that he has with him two Sisters, one much out of Health, very particular Friends of mrs Dewints. they proposed taking Lodgings at mrs Delanoes. If any Such persons have come into Town, you will...
The Children Say that they have your permission to come to Town to dine with Commodore Hull—and to Stay untill Saturday to visit the Carval I have accordingly let them take the Stage this morning—I think they had better accept mrs Fosters invitation & Lodge there, but that as you judge best; mrs Adams will be calld home, Elizabeth being again very sick—I hope to See you in Town tomorrow— yours...
This Evening my dear Daughter, will give you a Son, and me a Grandson, whom I have no doubt will prove himself worthy that Relation—He has plead So hard, and appeard so anxious and distrest, that it Should be so, before he again went abroad that I could no longer withhold my assent, and hav Susans Grandfather also joind with me, altho my former objections Still remained the Same. Tomorrow they...
Before I go into Bed, I must write you a few lines, after the agitation of the day—about Ten this morning Louisa announced a carriage & four comeing down the Hill. I ran to the door, it arrived in a few moments, the first who sprang out was John, who with his former ardour was round my neck in a moment. George followd half crazy calling out o Grandmother—o Grandmother. Charles half frightned,...
I wrote to you on Monday by mr Cruft in much anxiety about John requesting you to let hear from you pr post, if not by osburn—I have not heard a word Since. I mentiond I beleive Sending to Mr Fosters, but I had as good send to wisscasset—I got the carpet on Saturday by Mr Beal, but did not know it, when I wrote to you. I like it much. thank you. but I made the Crape answer tho not very...
I received your obliging favour of july 29th with the inclosure. I had not any objection to your taking a copy. It was my wish that you Should,—altho I hesitated at Saying So, least the partiality of a Parent Should mislead me. I feel that you take an interest in my present happiness, in the Safe return of my Son to his Native Country, altho I have not yet Seen him.—it is no Small...
Through the kind of attention of mr Crafts we learnt yesterday morning of the arrival of the Washington, and in the Evening, through our watchfull centinal Harriet, I received the gratefull intelligence under your own hand, that you were Landed and all well for which joyfull News to your parents; God be thanked—we now wait, in pleasing expectation of welcoming You; one and all, to the old...