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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Peabody, Elizabeth Smith Shaw

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Judge Blodget is here again, and offers to take Letters to you. he says he call’d and that you was not at home, nor my dear Cousin Betsy for whose Health I feel not a little anxious. how is she? has She a fever? has she a cough? Would not a journey serve her? has she been bled? I hear from you but Seldom. you would write oftner if you was a little more careless. I mean if you did not attend So...
I received your very excellent Letter they are all of which are very previous to me. I know your avocations & your necessary anxiety on account of the deranged Health of my dear Neice, Whom I pray God to restore. I know your feeling are sufficiently alive. I will not add to them by any observations of mine . my Heart sympathizes with you, let that suffice, we will look to the Ruler of the...
I received last week your very excellent Letter. Whatever you write is always precious to me. Know No one better knows how to touch every feeling of the humane Heart. I can allow for your long Silence, tho I wish it were not imposed upon you, by your numerous cares, and unavoidable avocations. the anxiety which you feel for the Health of a Beloved child, whom I pray God to restore to Health,...
I received your Letter of June 21. on the 29th. The extreem heat of the last week so totally unfitted me for every exertion that I could neither Eat, Sleep Read write or do any thing but labour to Breathe. I took the earliest opportunity to consult Dr Rush upon my dear Neices case, What is past, cannot be remidied, His opinion, as to her case is that Bleading would have been the first...
I have not written to you for a long time. it was my intention to have written by miss Palmer, but she went away a week earlier than she proposed when I saw her. She could however tell you that I was in better Health than when you left me. I have recoverd my Rest, and with it my Strength and Spirits have returnd in a great measure. I sent Richard Dexter to Philadelphia tho I have not yet had...
This Letter will be deliverd to you by your son whom you will find improved in his Health, greatly I think—the weather has been so very bad and the Roads almost impassiable since his return, so that it has not been practicable to make you an earlier visit. I have been very anxious for your dear little Girl, whom I have frequently heard an unfavourable account of, but miss Palmers last Letter...
I received your kind Letter of March 17th after I had written the inclosed. I know that I have been long indebted to you for a Letter, but I have felt ever since I was Sick, as tho I could not write, only when necessitated to. Man is born to trouble as the sparks flie upwards, we daily experience this truth; both your public and domestic occurrencies; and every one knows their own bitterness...
I am much mortified and dissapointed that I cannot have the pleasure which I anticipated of visiting you with the Children on their Return to Atkinson, I was threatned last week with a return of the complaint under which I labourd last Summer; but I was in hopes it would go of, and that a Ride would Serve me but I have not found it So. my things were all put up yesterday to sit out, but I am...
I had the pleasure of seeing mr Peabody here, yesterday mor’g he got here the night before, but it was late, and I was gone to Bed, tho’ I had exceeded my usual Hour before the President arrived. he brought William with him. I think I do not feel my last Summers Sickness in any way, so sensible, as by being languid, and wanting my rest at a particular Hour. If I vary much, I lose my Sleep— I...
Yesterday the President Sit of for Trentown and on Wednesday the 9th of this Month I go; I could have wisht to have seen you here first but knowing the vacancy will not commence untill after I Sit out, I despair of it. William regreeted that he was obliged to go without Seeing you, but a Sudden call of the President to Trentown to consult with Ministers, &C obliged him to leave home early than...