You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
  • Recipient

    • Cranch, Mary Smith

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Cranch, Mary Smith"
Results 1-30 of 61 sorted by recipient
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have not written to you since I receivd your Letter giving me an Account of the ordination, the fatigues of which I should have been glad to have shared with you, and I could not but blame myself, that I did not write to request mrs Porter to have opend our House, and Stables, and to have accomodated as many persons as they could. It is now happily over and I congratulate the Town in having...
I received a few lines from you yesterday, in replie to mr Bates queries. I would have the Room above finishd off the Same Size with the lower Room, the North Clossets to remain in the Room and Chamber, the Stairs to be one flight, a portico with a flat Top which I would have leaded, and a Similar one built over the front door of the House, the two trees cut down, but I do not wish to have the...
It is a great grief to me my dear sister that I can do So little for you in your trouble when I owe So much to you. beside being much of an invalid myself Jackson is very Sick keeps his Bed—and a thousand cares devolve upon me in concequence of the Sudden determination very reluctantly enterd into from a sense at this late period, without any previous arrangment. but all this is Small in...
What no Letters from Quincy has been repeated every day for a week upon the return of every messenger from the post office. I was hunting up my pen this morning & going to sit down and inquire whether my dear sister was sick when yours of May 10th was brought me. you can hardly judge how impatient I feel if I do not hear once a week, but have you not received a Letter from me inclosing a Bill...
we left philadelphia on Wednesday last. the day preceeding was very Hot a partial rain had waterd the Roads for 15 or 20 miles So as to render the first part of our journey pleasent. we were overtaken by showers and detained by them, but on thursday we found clouds of dust for want of Rain. troops and calvacades did not lessen it, and the Heat was intolerably oppressive, So much so as to...
Your kind Letter reachd me on the 20th. I began to feel very impatient to hear from you; your Letter afforded me much pleasure; I rejoice that so worthy and amiable a man as mr Kendall allways appeard to me, is like to be so soon, and agreably setled. I would willingly exchange all the discourses I have heard here since I came and all I shall be like to hear, for the one half which e’en chance...
Mr Lincoln our Carpenter came this morning from Weymouth he saw mrs Humphries who watchd last night with Mrs Norten. She Said that mrs Norten was a little revived this morning I hope with trembling—may we be enabled to say Gods will be done for herself we need feel no anxiety. She will be relieved from her Earthly duties which Seem too great for her feeble Frame frame but for her Friends and...
Inclosed is a Letter for the Doctor as the contents are valuable you will be so kind as to deliver it yourself, and give me notice that you have received it and done so by the first post I Shall want to hear very often from you and to know how our affairs progress. I am most anxious about the painting and having the Rooms of the old House in order. Mrs Porter must have help. She will have Such...
Mrs Smith Louisa mrs otis Rush Peters and a number of young Ladies are just gone to Congress to hear the Speech which is deliverd at 12 oclock to day; I should have liked well enough to have been of the party, but it would not have been proper—you will see it, as soon as you will get the Letter I presume Some people will not be pleased, I Suppose because it will not disclose enough about the...
I yesterday received your Letter of the 19th. I think you have testified your proportion of Respect in a handsome Manner to the Memory of the good and virtuous Washington.—That he ought to live in our Memories, and be transmitted to posterity as a Character truly worthy Imitation, is Right; but some Eulogyst have asscribed to him Solely, what was the joint effort and concert of many. To no one...
I expected to have heard from you on Saturday, but no Letter came and on Wedensday but Still no Letter. I was dissapointed, but knowing your many avocations I concluded it must arise from thence. I hope not from Sickness tho you wrote me you was not well. I who have more leisure and no care of Family affairs but my orders can and do devote almost every morning in writing to Some Friend or...
Death, thou art no Respecter of persons; Washington is no more! a Great Man has fallen, and his End is peace, I shall dye said he, but death has no terrors for me; this Melancholy Event, was this day brought to this city by the mail and by private Letters; the Croup was the rapid disease which put a period to the days, of him whose, memory will I trust be Embalmed in the Hearts of all true...
It is with great pleasure my dear Sister that I can say to you, your Son has recoverd from a dangerous complaint which threw us all here into great distress and anxiety upon his account. He returnd from Court sick, it proved to be a Billious Cholic. mr Johnson wrote mrs Johnson that he had been to see him, but that he was so ill that he could not be seen. the Children too were all Sick, and...
I received yours of June the first. I am quite delighted at the account you give of the Season and the appearence of vegetation. I was out yesterday at a Farm of Judge Peters call’d, Belmont, it is in all its Glory. I have been twice there, when I lived at Bush Hill, but he has improved both the House and Gardens since—after being six Months in a City, you can hardly conceive the delight one...
I received your Letter yesterday. I know from what I saw and heard whilst I was at home that there was pains taken to make mr & mrs Porter uneasy, and that they were too apt to listen to Stories which were in themselves Idle, and arrised from Envy. many would be glad to get into their hands Such a charge as is left with mr & mrs. Porter, who would not be so honest in their care and attention...
The weather has been so oppressively Hot for this week, and the streets of the City so nausious that I expect the concequences which must follow. they already begincomplaints of the Bowels are frequent & an inflamitory Soar throat. Frederick has got below after 5 bleedings Blistering &c Becky is now sick with it. hers is less upon her throat, more in her Bowels, not much fever. I hope hers...
I write you a few lines to day, but the weather is so Hot and close and the flies so tormenting that I can not have any comfort. The mornings instead of being pleasent as with you, are Stagnant. Not a leaf Stirs till nine or ten oclock. I get up & drop into my chair; without Spirits or vigor, breath a Sigh for Quincy, and regret that necessity obliges us to remain here. It grows Sickly. the...
I think you have been exercised in deeds of Charity to that poor forlorn Man who would once have said, is thy Servant a dog, that he should become a living prey to worms, or what is worse? He is a most striking instance of Indolence, and having no stimulous to action! none of those tender endearing ties of wife, child, Sister, or Brother. Indolence Created first an apathy, and apathy crept on...
I arrived in this City on Sunday the 16th ult—having lost my way in the woods on Saturday in going from Baltimore we took the road to Frederick and got nine miles out of our road. you find nothing but a Forest & Woods on the way, for 16 and 18 miles not a village. here and there a thatchd cottage without a Single pane of glass—inhabited by Black’s—my intention was to have reachd Washington on...
I did not write to you the last week. I supposed you must be much occupied by the ordination which I hope is happily over and that I may congratulate you as well as myself upon again having a setled pastor, in whose society I promise myself much pleasure please god to continue my Life— I cannot entertain you with any thing new. I have the pleasure of mrs Cushings company frequently. She will...
I got to Westown on Wednesday by four oclock and was met two miles from Town by mrs Otis, accompanied by mrs Marshall who insisted upon my putting up with them I accordingly went, and was very kindly and hospitably receivd by the Col and his Family. the old Gentleman who is now more than 80 years, still retains much of the fire and sprightlyness of youth. he is very infirm in health, but...
I received your Letter of the 23d this morning. I should be glad you would inform me from time to time the state mrs Mears is in. I have told mrs. Brislr that She was ill, but as she it cannot be of any service to mrs. Mears, I think best not to let her know of her relapse tho I fear it will finally be fatal to mrs Mears. Mrs Brisler would so distress herself as very probably to bring on her...
but I was thinking so much of Quincy, that I mechanically dated from thence; when I sent Letters for Louisa, mrs Brisler &c by yesterdays mail; I could not get time to add a line of my own; being engaged in writing to Berlin by the British packet. Since my last to you, I have recived a Letter from Mrs Johnson inclosing Letters to her, both from mr & mrs A— at which I rejoiced. She has thought...
The reflections which this morning have occupied my mind previous to taking my pen, have been of a Solemn & melancholy Nature. wherefore O Lord art thou thus contending with thy people, that one prop after an other is taken from them? The Sudden death of Dr Belknap has filld my Heart with Sorrow, following So Soon after dr Clark, and I presume from the account in the paper, in as Sudden a...
Mr Black got here on Thursday night. I was rejoiced to see him. It seemd next to being at home. I yesterday received your Letter of April 29th. I had heard before both of Sukys death and my dear little Marys. I felt hers the more sensibly, because she was more endeared to me from having been more with me than either of the other Children. my Heart is grieved for mr and mrs Smith who for this...
I wrote to you twice from East Chester. I left there the day I proposed; and had a fine passage across the North River. It was quite calm & not cold. We proceeded on our journey to Newark the same day, and there finding that we could go to Brunswick as conveniently by travelling through Springfield and Scotch plain to plainfield the place where the Col Smith is encampd with three Regiments, we...
I know not what could have become of a Letter written to you upon the 18 of december that upon the 30th You should not have received it,—I have written you more than once since that period, but do not recollect the Dates. I forget whether it was before or since then, that I inclosed to you a crown of a cap & Band. Since, that I have sent the Border and a Cap for mrs Morten, which I think you...
Yesterday mr Johnson and his Mamma arrived here in good Health. by her I heard from mr & mrs Cranch. She poor thing has had a mishap. I rather think it good than ill luck however for it is sad Slavery to have children as fast as she has. She has recoverd tho she is thin & weak. Your son is rising Rising in his own estimation, which was the place where he most wanted it. he plead a cause, spoke...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
I received on Saturday Yours of May 28th. I wrote you on Saturday previous to my receiving yours. I am very sorry if the Box I Sent Should be lost. it was a square Box coverd with canvass, the Same you sent my cap in last Summer, addrest to mr Smith. the dress in it together with the handkerchief, Ruffels &c was of 30 dollors value. I intended it for Betsys wedding dress. the vessels Name the...