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Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
I congratulate you upon your safe arrival in the cold Regions of the North: to which I hope your constitution will get enured: you must borrow the ermin from the inhabitants of the forests, and wrap yourself in the furs which Nature has amply provided in those cold climates. How does my dear Boy Charles? I have learnt by way of young Mr Grey, that he was quite an amusement to them upon the...
This is the last day of Sep’br, and the month is thus far expended, without my addressing a line to you in reply to your Letter of June 27th. I have now Seizd my pen, that the Swift winged hours, may no longer leave me your Debtor. By your Letter I learn that Mars and Belona, have quitted the Stage, to give place to Venus and Cupid, and the Loud Clangor of Arms, is lulled into a soft Hymanal...
do not think that I have not participated in your Joy, upon the Birth of your daughter, because I have not sooner congratulated you upon the event. Let it be to you cause of gratitude and thankfulness that you have reason to sing of Mercies, as you have abundent occasion to do, for The lives and Health of your two sons whom you left under the care and patronage of two of the best of Friends....
I never know how to let a vessel go from Boston, without a Letter to Some of the Family. I have just written by the Mary, for Liverpool, but as a Gentleman calld yesterday to request Letters, I have given him one, for my Son, and one for mr Smith. this I have directed to be put in the Bag, as it incloses one from your Sister Hellen, which She Sent one for you— Mr Brooks has taken charge of the...
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
How shall I address a Letter to you, how share and participate in your Grief without opening affresh the wound which time may in some measure have healed? distance excluded me from knowing Your distress, or shareing your Sorrows, at the time when you most needed consolation but neither time, or distance has banishd from my Bosom, that Sympathy which alltho, Billows rise; and oceans Roll...
I attempted to write to you, by Captain Bronson in Jan’ry but my strength failed me, and I have been ever since, in so low, and debilitated a state of Health, as to despair of ever recovering strength again, but for the last ten days, I have gained some, and my physician, encourages me, that I shall be benefitted by the returning Spring. I have not had any disease, such as fever, cough, or...
I this day received a Letter from my son dated october 21 from constradt—we had heard three weeks before of your arrival there by a vessel which came in to Salem, I rejoice that you are once more released from old ocean, and that you were so near the place of your destination. your voyage has been long and tedious. I hope you will experience Friendship and hospitality altho in so frozen a...
I Sit down to write to my dear daughter, almost without a hope, or wish that She Should receive it at St. Petersburgh. for as Letters are usually, more than three Months reaching the place of their destination—I hope you will have Embarked for America, before that period. it admits however of a possibility, that you may not, and in that case, a Letter will be welcome which communicates to you,...
Your Letter of Jan’ry 6 I received last Evening. your Children are very well, and very well taken care of. so do not give yourself any anxious solisitude about them. I believe they are much better off than they could have been at any boarding House in washington, where they must have been confined in some degree; or have mixd with improper persons; with respect to John, the Child enjoys...
It was with great pleasure that I received and read your Letter of August 6th from Ealing, and it communicated to me a double portion of delight, as it appeard to be the emanation of a mind more at ease, than you experienced in that cold dark region of Russia—Altho the climate of G Britain is much more humid than that of America, and you can never as the proverb, says praise a fair day, untill...
your Letter from St petersburgh of october 28th I received the last week, four Months after the date; it was quite as soon as I expected to hear considering the season of the year. I rejoiced to learn that you were safe from the dangers of the Sea, and had reached the City of your residence in health, after the fatigues, and dangers of so long a voyage. difficulties you will no doubt encounter...
Altho I have not the pleasure to acknowledg any Letter from you of a more recent date, than one by mr Forbes of Sep’ber last, which I only received a few days since, I will thank you for that, and am happy that I can congratulate you, upon a change in the aspect of our National affairs since that date, when they appeard to us in America; in not much less of a gloomy cast than to you in St...
It was with great pleasure, that I received your Letter from St. Petersburgh, bearing date july the 10th 1814 forwarded by mr Smith and your Sister, who from a combination of circumstances were detaind abroad: untill the 2d of May 1815 when they happily arrived in N york—bringing with them the pleasing, intelligence that you had reach’d Paris—the day after they left it— I cannot describe to...
A long period has elapsed since I addrest a line to you—I have not taken my pen for three weeks—I have been so constantly occupied with my visitors, and a sick domestic, who has been near dieing with a Billious fever the whole time my Friends were with me, that I could not find a leisure moment. mr & mrs DeWint his Mother their children and servants left us last week, about the time when...
Altho I have not written to you since the return of your Husband to Quincy, I have had the pleasure of hearing weekly from you through him; and of learning that you, and the Children are well. I want to see the dear Boys, and regret that they are like to be so long seperated from me. George will forget us and John cannot know us. I have a great opinion of childrens being early attached to...
My correspondence has been much interrupted the last fortnight Susan has been So feeble and weak, that She has required much care and attention She is now but just able to leave her Chamber, and that only for a short time, and we have had ten days of dismal wet weather, in which the Sun has not once Shone,—it has produced much Sickness, of the Quincy and Croup kind, with Children—My Son T B As...
I have to acknowledge your obligeing Letter of June the 18th, and to thank you for the communications—our News papers had previously announced the presentation of mrs Adams at the Queens drawing Room, and copied from the morning Chronical, the distinguishd elegance and taste of her dress. This has Set the wits of all our Bells to work, to find out what Lama triming is, that Elegant article not...
I received yesterday your journal to the 21st of Jan’ry. Washington Seems to be in a whirpool of dissipation—well described by Scott in his tales of my Landlord—“a chase through Life, after follies not worth catching; and when caught successively thrown away; a chase pursued from days of tottering infancy to old Age—Toys and merry makings in Childhood, Love and its absurdities in youth....
As I hope you are now in a Situation both to receive Letters, and write them with more Security that they will reach their destination. I flatter myself that I Shall hear oftner from you. By the Amsterdam packet which is to Sail on Sunday, I Shall endeavour to Send this Letter, and as I have lately written by an other vessel to my Son, I Shall address this to you, to congratulate you, as I...
I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
The mountains have vanished, and the ground is again bare in most places. the roads are excessive rough, and the weather uncommonly cold for March. I hope it will Soften & the Roads become smoother, before Saturday when I shall send in the carriage for you. I do not think that George will have the Measles. I thought that voyage to England, would end in a matrimonial engagement in Boston I wish...
Scarcly a week has past, for these two Months in which I have not written either to my Son, or to you, but our Letters are not only committed to the Chance, of winds and waves, which may Scatter them like the leaves of the Sibyls, but they have many other hazards to run, through the Dens of Cyclopes, and the fangs of the Harpies. I write this to Send you by the Ship Hugh Johnston, Captain...
I have to acknowledge a very tender and affectionate Letter from you, bearing date 8th Janry 1814, which I received only a few days since.—Sympathy from those we Love, when affliction assail us, is balm to the Bleading Bosom, and assuages the wound it cannot heal, and which is opened affresh. "when Memory with busy art will o’er the heart Strings play wake tender strains, tho full of smart Nor...
I address you, altho I know not where to find you, which is, and has been a source of much anxiety to me, four months have elapsed since the signature of the Treaty of Peace; when mr Adams wrote from Ghent, that in ten day’s, he should go to Paris, and from thence, send on to St petersburgh, to request you to join him there, and if he should, (as was expected,) be sent to England, that your...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...