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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, John

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By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
enclosed is the money which mrs Welsh advanced upon your account which you will pay her, and get her to Sign the Receit enclosed. you have not sent your shoes to be mended—& Charl e s if bare foot I have no compassion for as he would not take the trouble to call upon the shoe maker, he ought to feel the concequence—I Shall expect to see you on Saturday your affectionate G M MHi : Adams Papers.
mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
I received your Letter by mr Beals, and was very glad to learn that you and your Brother had enterd School you will very soon get familiar with it, and if you do as well as you know how, you will not be behind your Class. If Charles is really unwell; mrs Welsh will give him something to take, and he must restrain his appetite which was too keen for the season of the Year. I would have you call...
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
I am not conscious that I have been deficient in a return to all the Letters you have written to me, and I now acknowledge your last, july 31st you have had a long vacation—I hope it has not all been Spent in amusement, and dissipation—you knew I used to wish you back to your School; when the vacation was only a fortnight. you sometimes used to think hard of it. you will not think so, when you...
I always feel gay, when I take my pen to write to you. it is the recollection of your ardour, your intrepidity your and your Sparkling Eyes, and rosy cheeks which appeard to me the other Night, heightned by your return to your Native State & country which animated your whole frame, when you ran eagerly into the Arms of your Grandmother, which so gratified me, that I regreted when I awoke, and...
Your Letter of Sep’br th 11 came safe to hand, and I was well pleasd With the account you give me of your pursuits. if you give proper attention to each department of your Studies, You cannot Spend much Idle time.—you have improved in your hand writing, and in your composition. Your Mother writes me that you learn fast. I know that you have a capacity to acquire what ever with dilligence you...
I was much pleased to receive your Letter of july 26th and to mark your improvement in your hand writing & in the regularity of your lines; Your Visit to Clapham must have been very delightfull to you: It is a pleasant village. I used to go often there when I resided in London, to visit an American family by the name of Vassel. I should like to know if any Branch of it, are yet living? There...
knowing what a punctilious young gentleman you are, I would not let your old Captain Bronson Sail again without a Letter to you by mr Charles Dexter You notice your Birth day, and Say you are twelve years old. I do assure you Sir it was celebrated here, not withstanding your absence as usual; with the ringing of Bells publick orations, military parade and social festivals, nor did we forget to...
pray how did you succeed with your new commission? I heard you was made Commander-in chief of the Regiment of Poultry, on Board ship—with full powers to deal out their Rations, at your pleasure, and I learnt from a Letter of mr Ticknors two days after you sail’d, that you were well, and studied to his satisfaction. While I am writing this I flatter myself that you have made half your voyage,...
I thank you for your Letter: and was very glad to hear from you; I was the more gratified to hear from you because I had written to your Brother, and not to you. I thinke George ought to have written. to your inquiries how the Family are, I can give you but a poor account. I have been sicke and confined to my chamber ever since you went away, and your Aunt Adams has been, and still is sicke...
It is better to go to the House of mourning than to the House of Feasting, or dancing, for the living lay it to heart. you my dear Children are now calld to the House of mourning and Sorrow, by the death of your dear Aunt Smith and the only daughter of your Grandparents, the only Sister of your Father. your Aunt died last night, to the deep affliction of the whole Family—her pure Spirit I...
I received this day a Letter from your father dated 21 Sep’br. it was a Letter different from any which I have before received from him.—it communicated to me, and to you the sorrowfull intelligence of the Death of your dear and only Sister. She was taken Sick in August, and died the 15th of Seb’br with a nervous fever which brought on convulsions your parents are in great affliction as you...
I Suppose you will think that Grandmama might have written you a few lines. well you shall not be dissapointed altho I have much writing to do, as vessels are getting ready to go to Russia—Captain Bainbridge arrived from there, this week, and brought Letters. he saw your Father and Mother in october, and he Says in a Letter to your Grandfather incloseing those from your father “Sir your Little...
I hope you have received your mittins, and your Brother his, which Mrs. Foster took a fortnight since and promissed to send to you, but I fear she has not found a conveyance. I am the easier because your Aunt wrote me that she had provided for you. I thank you for your Letter which was so much better written than your Brothers, that I could not keep saying you had learnt more good hand writing...
I have not written you a Letter yet, but I promissed you one, and I now have the pleasure of inclosing a Letter from your Brother Charles to you. I had a Letter from your Father dated in Sepbr th 11: the day after your Sister was Baptized. she was call’d Louisa Catharine, the Rev’d Dr Pitt, Chaplain to the English Church in St Petersburgh performed the Service, and mr Harris our Consul there...
I write you once more from this city. the Trenton River is impassable and has prevented my sitting out. we hope however that the Rain may clear it. I Sent Townsend of to day; I have heard Some of the democratic rejoicing such as Ringing Bells & fireing cannon; what an inconsistancy said a Lady to me to day, the Bells of Christ Church ringing peals of rejoicing for an Infidel president! The...
I reachd this city on tuesday Evening. at Baltimore Leiut Parker came in to see me, and offerd his service to me; I had engaged a carriage of Evans to take me here with good horses and a carefull driver, for which I was to give him 80 dollars or in proportion if I could not get across the Susquahannah I offerd mr Parker a seat with me. he was very usefull to me and exerted himself very much or...
I arrived here about half after Six, without any accident, but beat and bang’d enough I do not wish for the present, a severer punishment to the Jacobins & half feds who have Sent me home at this Season, than to travel the Roads in the San Culot Stile just now; the Roads were hard frozen points up, all the way. We were 4 hours making our first Stage, and then commenced a voilent Snow Storm....
I reachd this city on Sunday Evening and have waited one day to rest myself and Horses. my health is but feeble and a little over fatigue deprives me of my rest—I Shall Sit off this morning, but cannot make more than 25 or 30 miles a day. I Shall endeavour to reach Washington on Saturday if the Weather will permit. it would be an ease to the horses if Curry could come half way to Baltimore and...
after a Sleepless night I begin my journey with an anxious mind, tho not a desponding one. my dear Sister is I hope out of danger, tho So low and weak as not to be able either to stand or walk. mrs Norten whom we had all burried in our expectations is getting up again. Thus have I cause of comfort that Death has not enterd their doors Whilst in my own family I have cause to mourn the Death of...
I have not written to you since you left me, but as I know you must feel anxious to hear—I write tho it will but add to your apprehensions; my own Health has mended, tho the weather has been so wet and unpleasent that I have not dared to venture out, not even to see my dear sister in her sickness and distress. She is very low with the fever confined to her Bed. Katy Gannet taken down, & George...
Mr Gore came out this afternoon to see me, and informd me that mr Dexter proposed to sit out tomorrow for Washington. by him I embrace the earliest opportunity of informing you of my safe arrival at Quincy on Saturday the last day of May, in good health tho some thing fatigued I got on very well, met with no accident, Horses all in good order. I found our Friends here well. the Hill looks very...
I reachd this City in good Health last evening. I have not felt dissagreable at any place upon My Journey through absence of any Gentleman Attendent, except at this North River I found a Boat just going off, With Several Horses and Chaises on board, my own Carriage could not go—I saw none but Irishmen by their Tongues going on Board, decent looking people however. the ferryman, appeard civil...
The rain comeing on the morning I left Bristol, I reachd about noon and remaind there untill yesterday morning when I procceeded to Brunswick Soon after I got there the Col. & Major Ripley arrived, and informd me that mrs. Smith would expect me to dinner. We accordingly sit out and got here about 2 oclock. The Col. was not able to be absent as Gen’ll. Hamilton was on his way to Capp Camp—and...
we reachd this place at half after Six we found the old inhabitants gone, the new inn keepers name Tombes, the people civil and obligeing, every thing very neat Jackson drove very well. Farmer and Favorite lazy Traveller & ceasar brisk I am fully of the mind that a middle Size Horse travels with more ease to himself, and pleasure to the driver. we shall get on Slowly. I had rather have the...
I received last Evening yours of the 25—with a Heart filled with gratitude, for the many Blessings I have enjoyed through the 35 years of our union; I would not look upon a single Shade in the picture; for if according to Rousseaus philosophy, abstinence from what we delight in, is the Epicurism of reason; I have had my full proportion of enjoyment; This day is very fine, I almost regret to...
I wrote you a few lines by Brisler who I hope will reach you today, if Johns Mumps do not prevent him from travelling. Louisas continues very much sweld yet, and it is the Sixth day since they first appeard. Caroline is seizd with a most voilent inflamation in her Eyes, so as to throw her into a fever; and oblige the Dr. to lay blisters upon her to relieve her. She is rather better to day, but...
I have only time whilst the Stage Stops a few moments to say that I received yours of 24 last Evening. the day was not forgotten by me. mrs Smith invited mr Otis and Family to dine with us upon the occasion, and made the token of New England thanksgiving a fine plumb pudding, and the company toasted the day & many happy returns of it— Your Letter added to the pleasure of the Day by informing...