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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
ever Since your last Letter to the president I have had a great inclination to address a Letter to mr vanderkamp and being now confined to my chamber by an attack of the Reumatism, I find a leisure hour to address my Friend in his Solitute In the first place, I assure him I have not any pretentions to the Character of a Learned Lady, and very therefore according to his creed intitled to his...
I yesterday received your Letter from Annapolis of May 8th. I congratulate you my dear Sir, that altho the clouds have been darkned round you, and altho You have experienced by death the loss of kind and worthey Friends, others are rising up to Supply their place. the opening now which presents itself, is Such as may give you Sanguine hopes & Light prospect. I sincerely wish they may be...
I have not had any opportunity of writing to you before—indeed I have been So occupied: that I have not had time, for beside Sickness, the good folk who love Sleighing have many of them embraced this opportunity of visiting us; and Louissa wants constant watching to Supply her by little & little with the small nourishment She takes and to See that She does not exceed her Strength by Sitting up...
The voice of the Nation call’s you home. the Government call you home—and your parents unite in the general call to this Summons. you must not, you cannot refuse your assent, nor will you, I presume have a disposition to regret so honorable an appointment, as is assignd to you; by so unanimous a vote— It is now more than four months Since the News papers from all parts of the united States,...
I have not noticed your Letter bearing date 10 Novb’r—I had begun to think that you had renounced me as a correspondent—not having had a line from you for a long time—Like other Ladies who when Slighted turn their Backs or otherways express their Sense of it I did not feel myself obligated to write again—and gratified myself by reading Your Letters to Your Grandfather, and discharging my duty...
I wrote the inclosed a few days Since, but not having an opportunity to Send it which I liked I have kept it for the memorandum which it contains—Louisa gets a little strength, tho She Swells and puffs in her feet and arms, no perspiration upon her. her appetite is better and She bears the Bark which is a good Symptom. these March winds are intolerable, worse than the coldest we have had...
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
I received your very kind Letter, in which you take so great interest in my health, that I am bound to say much of myself in return; for I have profited by your admonitions and those of my other Friends.In the first place, I indulge myself in the morning, and seldom rise before the sun I use no more exercise than I think my health requires—altho I frequently hear, o do not go there, do not do...
I write you a few lines in addition to what I have already written, and inclose you the Copy of a Letter from mr Otis to your Father, by which you will learn that your Nomination as Secretary of State, was confirmd, with one only dissenting vote, just sufficient to save you from the war. whose it was I neither know or care for no president since Washington, has been chosen by the people, with...
There is Surely a Secret Sympathy between us, for the very week in which you have written me I was contemplating to write you a Letter. I was only doubtfull where to address it. You have kindly removed this difficulty, and I have the pleasure to learn by your Letter that you have past the winter Socially with your Friends at Plimouth—Solitary you never were when inhabiting your own...
I received your letter of Feb’ry 19th inst, was rejoiced to find you writing again. It was my intention Sooner to have replied to you, but your own experience under Similar Circumstances will allow for my omission, when I inform you that Louisa was Suddenly seizd with bleading, like that which has twice attackd you, and this from being a large vessel in the Stomack, was so profuse, as to...
I was rejoiced when I found the justice of Congress had made some necessary Provision for the office you now hold, altho they withheld a Clerk. I Should have been more gratified if their Liberality had extended to that, and an increase of the Sallery. the Duties of your office, must I am Sure, occupy the greater part of your time; but nothing is harder than to convince the purse holders that...
Mr W S Smith with Mrs Smith are upon a visit to her Relations in Washington. he is desirious of paying his Respects to you, as a Relation, and as a desendent of the Venerable Characters, whom he remembers with Respect and veneration— He is desirious of obtaining employment under the Government. in what Capacity I do not know. His being So nearly Related to me, deprives him of all the advantage...
We promise ourselves the pleasure of visiting you on fryday next, and hope that a Severe Cold now attacking both the President and myself, will yiald before that day, to Herb Tea, and mild weather. nothing but indisposition will prevent our accepting Your kind invitation, or I Should add, Stormy weather. Many thanks for the Balsam My Neice continues way weak, altho’ She has not had any return...
It would be ungratefull in me not to feel & pleased thank you for the interest you take in the Return of my Son to his Country to his parents and Friends; I do rejoice in the hope of Seeing him, yet with Sense Some trembling least my sanguine hopes may be blasted. we know not what a day my bring forth. he has been preserved through many dangers to which voyages across the ocean are always...
Susan has written you, I Suppose that mr Clark has returnd, and that he is very desirious of being married. She has also informd you of his income and means of Support. Will you under these Circumstances consent to their being married at present? They are Young, neither of them disposed to Habits of dissipation, but Such limited means I fear will involve them in difficulties. To keep House...
Your Letters are always Common property with the Family to hear from you, and know that you are all well, is a mutual gratification to us all—Your Father is not so punctual in acknowledging Letters, dates and numbers as you are, so that your last Letter to him of Janry 14th No 56 is left for me to notice, and laugh, at your excuse for its brevity. I have received several from you of the like...
Two more Letters accompany this for mr Lyman and if time will allow I have no doubt but I shall get an answer from mr Jefferson, as Luck would have it. George in his Letter to his Grandfather, Speaks of mr Sharp as having dinned with his father and having spoken of his Grandfather in handsome terms. this was a good opening to renew old acquaintance—I inclose to you two of the letters which...
What right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? Why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—but to the Subject of my present address. Mr Theodore Lyman, who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father, is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, & wealth, this...
what right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—   but to the Subject of my present address.    Mr Theodore Lyman , who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father , is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, &...
mr Clark will deliver you this Susan has a Letter from her Mother urgeing her to come to See her, and consenting to her.… which I cannot under present circumstances—so they say no more to me—I think with you that it will be best for them to go Silently and if a female travelling companion can be found at the Same time it will be more agreable—fine weather for your Father & Sister Mr C will...
I inclose to you a paper with the distrest State of an old Batchelor, not Supposing that you will answer the advertizement, but because amongst my acquaintance I know no one who So nearly answers his description—He has left his own qualifications out of the question—a dolt does he think to get Such a wife without Sterling worth on his own part? dr Franklin says “ a Batchelor is not a compleat...
The account of your Health and your debility gives me much concern. the frequent bleedings your Physician thinks Proper for you, quite allarms me. I am sure Louisa could not have Survived, if any blood had been taken from her. for more than a month, She could not rise from her Bed: to Sit while it was made, without fainting, and looking as if she could not be yet back alive. She has now So far...
I will write to you again, and untill I learn from you, that you have taken your passage home.—I have now to acknowledge a succession of Letters from you, arriveing nearly all together No 106. No 107 No 108 No 109 No 10010 and No 111 March the 16th which is the late date— I hope you did not think, when I wrote to you pressing your return to America, that my object was the office to which you...
When I received your Letter of the 8th, written upon a Sunday, for which you apologize, it brought to my mind a Letter I once read written upon a Sunday morning by the Revd dr Mayhew of Boston, to mr James otis, respecting Some secular affairs of importance. he began his Letter with these Words—“To a good man all time is holy, and none too holy, to do good.” I think you may have absolution...
The Books have come, and never were in the Custom house as I beleive. it was not a Box, but a package. Farmers Works are a part of them. mr Tappant, Sent them out. mr Aspinwall our consul had the charge of them, and they came in the Margaret Frances, and not as Supposed in the Galen I received your Note by mr Greenleaf. I inclose the pattern I like best. Seven yds if you please of it. Louissa...
I owe you many thanks for the early notice which you transmitted me, of mr Adams’s acceptance of the Appointment of State. untill yesterday, I have remaind without any direct communication from him. The Letter which I inclose for your perusal, I regret not having received a day or two Sooner, that I might have had the pleasure of communicating it to the President when he did us the favour of...
How shall we get on without you? I dont half like it. why cannot you come out with mr Shaw? if you had Said Yes mr Clarke would gladly have come in for you. taking all things into consideration—I made a proposition to them to day that they should be married on Sunday Evening—as they rejected having a dinner, for I could not see how I could avoid a dinner if they were married in the...
Through the kind of attention of mr Crafts we learnt yesterday morning of the arrival of the Washington, and in the Evening, through our watchfull centinal Harriet, I received the gratefull intelligence under your own hand, that you were Landed and all well for which joyfull News to your parents; God be thanked—we now wait, in pleasing expectation of welcoming You; one and all, to the old...