You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, Abigail Smith
  • Period

    • post-Madison Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 19

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 87 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Agreable to your Request we have concluded to Send you the picture. Mr Adams has been So occupied by public Buisness that he has not given any directions respecting it.—but as we know it will receive the greatest care from you; we have concluded to commit it to you; relying upon the promise given, that you will deliver it to our Son John Quincy Adams, when ever he calls for it— With...
mr Dexter will come to Boston tomorrow for the Trunks you must go with him to mr Crufts who when you pick out the Trunks will deliver them—I See that nobody here will attend to them if I do not—they are lodged at mr Thorndikes Store Custer lies very dangerously sick your GM MHi : Adams Papers.
The President has a letter from Vanderkemp, in which he proposes to have him send a collection of my letters to publish! A pretty figure I should make. No. No. I have not any ambition to appear in print. Heedless and inaccurate as I am, I have too much vanity to risk my reputation before the public. Printed Source--Letters of Mrs. Adams. Edited by Charles Francis Adams (Boston: 1840)..
enclosed is the money which mrs Welsh advanced upon your account which you will pay her, and get her to Sign the Receit enclosed. you have not sent your shoes to be mended—& Charl e s if bare foot I have no compassion for as he would not take the trouble to call upon the shoe maker, he ought to feel the concequence—I Shall expect to see you on Saturday your affectionate G M MHi : Adams Papers.
By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
Susan has written you, I Suppose that mr Clark has returnd, and that he is very desirious of being married. She has also informd you of his income and means of Support. Will you under these Circumstances consent to their being married at present? They are Young, neither of them disposed to Habits of dissipation, but Such limited means I fear will involve them in difficulties. To keep House...
This Evening my dear Daughter, will give you a Son, and me a Grandson, whom I have no doubt will prove himself worthy that Relation—He has plead So hard, and appeard so anxious and distrest, that it Should be so, before he again went abroad that I could no longer withhold my assent, and hav Susans Grandfather also joind with me, altho my former objections Still remained the Same. Tomorrow they...
“Delightful praise, like summer rose, That brighter in the dew-drop glows.” They were sweet drops which flowed from the heart to the eyes both of your grandfather and grandmother, when I read to him the two letters you had transcribed to your uncle and to your father, in commendation of your brother. You could not have offered a sweeter incense to your grandfather; and flowing from the pen of...
As Dean Swift says, “eyes with writing almost blind,” I commence a letter to you, near ten o’clock at night, after having written seven letters to go abroad by the Milo. I have been wishing to write to you all the week, but last Friday, in a snow storm, who should come to make me a visit, but Mrs. Cushing, who is always a welcome guest; she stayed until Tuesday; I could not leave her to write....
By a Letter which I received from Caroline dated 1st Sepbr She acquaints me that a mr Verplanck has a Letter of introduction from mr dewint to you, and that She wishes him to come to Quincy to See us, that he has with him two Sisters, one much out of Health, very particular Friends of mrs Dewints. they proposed taking Lodgings at mrs Delanoes. If any Such persons have come into Town, you will...
When I received your Letter of the 8th, written upon a Sunday, for which you apologize, it brought to my mind a Letter I once read written upon a Sunday morning by the Revd dr Mayhew of Boston, to mr James otis, respecting Some secular affairs of importance. he began his Letter with these Words—“To a good man all time is holy, and none too holy, to do good.” I think you may have absolution...
The account of your Health and your debility gives me much concern. the frequent bleedings your Physician thinks Proper for you, quite allarms me. I am sure Louisa could not have Survived, if any blood had been taken from her. for more than a month, She could not rise from her Bed: to Sit while it was made, without fainting, and looking as if she could not be yet back alive. She has now So far...
I will not let so good an opportunity pass without writing you a few Lines, to inquire after your Health, and to rejoice with you upon the return of your Sister, and Family to America, in good health, and with a more youthfull countanance than when She left us—but like Birds of passage, they left us, in one month for Washington— your three Nephews are with us George who has grown to the...
Thank you thank you dear Harriet for the Letter from mr Adams you sent me last Evening. tho only a few lines, it informd me that after a passage of 50 days from Cowes they had arrived all well—and should remain no longer in N york than to get out their baggage & necessary arrangements, that in a week or ten days they would be here—I presume by the close of the week or sooner—It will indeed be...
What right have I to be one of your tormentors? and amongst the numerous applicants for introductory Letters? Why I will plead, old acquaintance, old Friendship and your well known Benevolence—but to the Subject of my present address. Mr Theodore Lyman, who possesses an ardent thirst for Literature, and whose Father, is one of our most respectable Characters for probity, honour, & wealth, this...
I am indebted to you, for two very kind Letters The first, was written after my Grandaughter miss de Wint, had made you a visit. I ought to have inform’d you, how much She regreted, that it was not in her power to repeat it, and writing to me upon her return, that She was gratified in having visited a Lady, whom She knew; was much esteemd by her Grand Parents: as well as by her own Father, and...
mr Clark will deliver you this Susan has a Letter from her Mother urgeing her to come to See her, and consenting to her.… which I cannot under present circumstances—so they say no more to me—I think with you that it will be best for them to go Silently and if a female travelling companion can be found at the Same time it will be more agreable—fine weather for your Father & Sister Mr C will...
Upon taking up your Register the other day, a communication respecting drawing rooms, attracted my attention. Your correspondent must have been misinformed when he states, that there was any distinction of party made at the drawing room while I had the honor to preside there; any gentleman or lady, of either party, who chose to visit there, were received with equal civility. And from your...
I inclose to you a paper with the distrest State of an old Batchelor, not Supposing that you will answer the advertizement, but because amongst my acquaintance I know no one who So nearly answers his description—He has left his own qualifications out of the question—a dolt does he think to get Such a wife without Sterling worth on his own part? dr Franklin says “ a Batchelor is not a compleat...
So, so master John, your Back is up, because you have not been written to, as often as you thought your dignity required—why I really think there is Some reason for you to complain of your Hingham School Mates—but I beleive they are Scatterd now, not one of them remaining with mr Thimbull who were your companions—new ones Succeed Politeness requires that notice Should be taken of letters of...
I beleive you thought me very imprudent to consent to the Presidents going to Town So cold a day as yesterday—but the cold increased much after the morning and I was quite anxious untill he returnd—much pleased and gratified with his days excursion there is Such a thing as Staying at Home untill it becomes wearisome to us change of place, or dear variety compose part of our happiness I enclose...
I write you a few lines in addition to what I have already written, and inclose you the Copy of a Letter from mr Otis to your Father, by which you will learn that your Nomination as Secretary of State, was confirmd, with one only dissenting vote, just sufficient to save you from the war. whose it was I neither know or care for no president since Washington, has been chosen by the people, with...
I write but seldom to you, least you should feel as tho’ you were obliged to replie, when you must be much occupied with public Business and as I am now engaged to address you in that line, You will feel obliged to listen. My present design is to name to you a Gentleman for office conditionally. It is reported that Major Warren of plymouth is about to resign, or be removed from the office of...
I received the articles this morning cloth Nankeen Ribbon Letter covers &c altho the Gospel declares man & wife to be one, the Law of congress will not allow me that priviledge and my name upon a package or Letter Subjects me to postage—in future by post, let my good mans priviledge cover mine—I Send you my last Letter—what would have been Said in my day if Such Etiquette had been establishd?...
enclosed is a Letter which you will see contains a request to me; and through me to you. the ploughing with the Hiffer is not yet out of date. were the object an office, I should refuse to medle with it, but as it is only a simple renewal of a midshipman from one ship & station to an other, I would hope no great interest necessary; particularly as his Health has sufferd severely in this...
I have Sent the Shoe & Shall have a pr by Saturday—it is a folly to keep the Boots I Send—charles will out grow them—and as mr John wants to make money by them, his uncle consents to give him his price for them— osburn will call to day for the articles I Sent for—a line from you to Callender will get them for me. you will be so good as to pay him for them—I did not receive any Tea— The weather...
You justly appreciate the Sympathy of your Quincy Friends under the heavey affliction you have met with. they do in deed feel for you. when the Aged fall, it is the Curse of Nature, but when the young and promising are cut down e’er they reach the meridian of Life, we are led to inquire wherefore? and it is only in the belief of a “Being of unerring wisdom and goodness, that the from whom the...
enclosed is Harriets account which I wish you to Settle when you go to Town. I have had it some time She received 15 dollers of you—Your Father has a Bill to pay to mr Cary—and the marble chimney peice is to be included—Both amount to 28 dollars.—I have his Bill. I beleive there is some money due in B office I presume there is also something due in Philadelphia, and as we can get flower here...
I was rejoiced when I found the justice of Congress had made some necessary Provision for the office you now hold, altho they withheld a Clerk. I Should have been more gratified if their Liberality had extended to that, and an increase of the Sallery. the Duties of your office, must I am Sure, occupy the greater part of your time; but nothing is harder than to convince the purse holders that...
I received your Letter by mr Beals, and was very glad to learn that you and your Brother had enterd School you will very soon get familiar with it, and if you do as well as you know how, you will not be behind your Class. If Charles is really unwell; mrs Welsh will give him something to take, and he must restrain his appetite which was too keen for the season of the Year. I would have you call...