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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 21-30 of 87 sorted by editorial placement
I will write to you again, and untill I learn from you, that you have taken your passage home.—I have now to acknowledge a succession of Letters from you, arriveing nearly all together No 106. No 107 No 108 No 109 No 10010 and No 111 March the 16th which is the late date— I hope you did not think, when I wrote to you pressing your return to America, that my object was the office to which you...
When I received your Letter of the 8th, written upon a Sunday, for which you apologize, it brought to my mind a Letter I once read written upon a Sunday morning by the Revd dr Mayhew of Boston, to mr James otis, respecting Some secular affairs of importance. he began his Letter with these Words—“To a good man all time is holy, and none too holy, to do good.” I think you may have absolution...
The Books have come, and never were in the Custom house as I beleive. it was not a Box, but a package. Farmers Works are a part of them. mr Tappant, Sent them out. mr Aspinwall our consul had the charge of them, and they came in the Margaret Frances, and not as Supposed in the Galen I received your Note by mr Greenleaf. I inclose the pattern I like best. Seven yds if you please of it. Louissa...
I owe you many thanks for the early notice which you transmitted me, of mr Adams’s acceptance of the Appointment of State. untill yesterday, I have remaind without any direct communication from him. The Letter which I inclose for your perusal, I regret not having received a day or two Sooner, that I might have had the pleasure of communicating it to the President when he did us the favour of...
How shall we get on without you? I dont half like it. why cannot you come out with mr Shaw? if you had Said Yes mr Clarke would gladly have come in for you. taking all things into consideration—I made a proposition to them to day that they should be married on Sunday Evening—as they rejected having a dinner, for I could not see how I could avoid a dinner if they were married in the...
Through the kind of attention of mr Crafts we learnt yesterday morning of the arrival of the Washington, and in the Evening, through our watchfull centinal Harriet, I received the gratefull intelligence under your own hand, that you were Landed and all well for which joyfull News to your parents; God be thanked—we now wait, in pleasing expectation of welcoming You; one and all, to the old...
Thank you thank you dear Harriet for the Letter from mr Adams you sent me last Evening. tho only a few lines, it informd me that after a passage of 50 days from Cowes they had arrived all well—and should remain no longer in N york than to get out their baggage & necessary arrangements, that in a week or ten days they would be here—I presume by the close of the week or sooner—It will indeed be...
I received your obliging favour of july 29th with the inclosure. I had not any objection to your taking a copy. It was my wish that you Should,—altho I hesitated at Saying So, least the partiality of a Parent Should mislead me. I feel that you take an interest in my present happiness, in the Safe return of my Son to his Native Country, altho I have not yet Seen him.—it is no Small...
I wrote to you on Monday by mr Cruft in much anxiety about John requesting you to let hear from you pr post, if not by osburn—I have not heard a word Since. I mentiond I beleive Sending to Mr Fosters, but I had as good send to wisscasset—I got the carpet on Saturday by Mr Beal, but did not know it, when I wrote to you. I like it much. thank you. but I made the Crape answer tho not very...
This Evening my dear Daughter, will give you a Son, and me a Grandson, whom I have no doubt will prove himself worthy that Relation—He has plead So hard, and appeard so anxious and distrest, that it Should be so, before he again went abroad that I could no longer withhold my assent, and hav Susans Grandfather also joind with me, altho my former objections Still remained the Same. Tomorrow they...