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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
I expected to have heard from you by Mr Beal, but his comeing to dine yesterday with the club I presume prevented, the Snow has left us so far that we went in the carriage to meeting to day. We are all well, and wish to see you Dexter was in Town one day. I directed him to call, but he said the Town was so full, and so crouded that he could not leave his team; does mr Adams intend comeing out...
I will write you a line the first I have attempted, to tell you I am getting better I hope tho very slowly. I am very weak, and not a little anxious to hear how my dear Abigail is. sick as I have been I regret that she is from home, tho I doubt not you will receive every attention and kindness, but you must das assistance, and have a home, more particularly so in Sickness—as soon as you think...
Having finishd my Farm House avocations I sit down to inquire how you are, and how my dear little Girl is after your journey. the fog of the morning I feard would prevent your Sitting out early, and make it late before you reachd the much longed for paternal Habitation. I could enter into all your sensations upon approaching it, and meeting again a kind and affectionate Mother after a long...
Miss Ann Beal deliverd me your Letter this morning at meeting. you will see by my Letter of fryday Evening how much the President was dissapointed both by the travelling and weather. we adjournd the club on purpose. to day the travelling is better than since the snow fell. I have lookd up the articles you requested, and judging others by myself, that a kind turn will not be considerd as a...
we have not washd this week. I hope mr Adams has things enough. if the weather Should be good I can Send him Some on wednesday, if you can send me word whether he wants them—and he will also let me know when to Send the Horse and chaise for you—Sister cranch is better than she was She looks quite paled down. My Love to your Sister / from / your affectionate / Mother thank miss white for the...
I began a Letter to you on the 10 of this Month left it unfinishd, and so it is like to remain, an old Letter being of no more value than an old almanack—for to know how things are, when absent from the Scene, is better than to learn how they were a week before. At that period I had not heard of your safe arrival at Washington. Since I have received two Letters, one dated the 29st Novbr and...
I last week received your Letter of december 3d in replie to mine of Novbr 11th, not having made any mention of it before I thought it had miscarried. I am very sorry to learn by it, that you have been unwell. you must not let the mind wear so much upon the Body. Your disposition to a Sedentary Life prevents you from taking that regular excercise which the Body requires to keep it in a healthy...
Welcome, welcome, my dear Son to your native Land after a seven years absence from it. God be praised that you and Louissa, and my dear John George &c have arrived in Safety, but I have trembled for you, least the extreem Heat you must have experienced Since your arrival should be too much for you all. The Sudden change we have experienced of no less than 30 degrees, is equally trying to weak...
I have found the posts belonging to the Bed and would have sent them down by the Horse cart, but William is not yet well enough to go. the Snow prevented mr Bates from going, the day he intended and the week is now so far advanced that he has thought best to stay till Monday when he will attend you, and the cart shall then take in the Bed posts & his tools. rs Greenleaf sent me word, that the...
This is the first Snow which we have had of any concequence; and this promisses to be keep. It began last night and has continued increasing all day. It is now mid day, and the storm is cold and severe, the wind North. I cannot tell you how the Glass stands, for when I went in the absence of your Brother & Sister; to take an observation as I promissed, the window was frozen down So tight, that...
I am sorry to say that I write you from my Sick Chamber, where I have been confined for near a week with the Severest attack of the Rhumatism which I have experienced for many years in my Limbs. I hope it will not be very durable, but submission is my lesson, and patience my Study. We last Evening received the Port Folio containing the Character of your much Loved Friend. I read it with a...
I sympathize with you in the loss you have sustained, and rejoice that the event did not prove fatal to the mother, as well as Child. Let me hear from you when you get a Letter from Washington. your affectionate MHi : Adams Papers.
I begin my Letter by announcing the Health of your Children, that your mind and that of their Mothers may be at ease & “they cannot speak for themselves it is true,” but there are Mothers who are not less anxious for those who can speak for themselves; and it is with much pain that I learn from your Friends that your Health does not appear to have been mended by your journey, or change of...
I am desirious of writing you a few lines just to assure you that I am able to hold a pen, and that I hope my Health is not in a more declining state than when you left me, altho I have not been able to leave my chamber since; except to ride a little way a few times; I think I have gained a little strength the last week tho I have not got the better of the most debilitating of my complaints—a...
When Mr. Hall was here your Father told him that he would leave to you the adjustment of the shares in the cannal. the Sale of them was undoubtedly a great Sacrifice of property at their present valueSo was the payment of the assesments. but I hope it will prove for the best. Your Father says that he would have you take as of his Shares in the New England Insurence as will repay you what you...
Those of the family who could not attend yesterday at Cambridge yesterday as well as those who did, are very desirious of reading the lecture. if you will be so good as to let William take it, to day, I will return it on Monday. I wish a few of the Reviews if you can spair them. I carried to Town yesterday your Shirt overalls & waistcoat & handkerchiefs which you left here. as mrs Adams was...
Your trusty driver took such care of your Letter that he kept it close in his pocket for a whole week after he returnd, untill ragged and dirty it reachd us last Evening 10 days after it was written. it was however very welcome, being the first intelligence which had reachd us of you, from the time you left us.— I requested your Brother to write to you to Philadelphia, as I was unable too,...
I fear your Father may have given you unnecessary anxiety; I told him at the time it was not best to mention an indisposition so slight as John’s was, but he said if he wrote; he must tell all. I had observed for several days about noon a high coulour in his cheeks, and at that time, he was unusually irritable, Some other Symptoms indicated a redundancy of Bile, which proved to be the case....
We have had in the Week past the coldest Weather that has been through the winter, yet we have not had Snow enough through the Season to cover the ground. I expet Febry and March will pour upon us the whole quantity which the cold must have engenderd through the Winter. The Season has been very healthy. few cold’s or coughs. George after spending a fortnight with me and getting quite rid of...
I was much pleased at receiving your Letter of March 14th. It was a much longer interval than had occured before, without receiving a line from you. but Mrs Quincys kindness in always mentioning you to my sister had relieved me from the fears that you might be sick. it is with Sincere Satisfaction that I learn from your own hand that your Health is much mended. When a Man enjoys good Health,...
You have been so good in writing to your Father and Brother that I ought not to complain that you have not particularly addrest a Letter to me, tho I wanted to know how George was grown, and whether he rememberd you and what he had to say to you. John I think you told me was quite different in his temper and disposition, more sturdy and harder to manage. these are subjects much more...
I am indebted to you for two Letters Since I wrote to you. Your Letter of december 22d. I thank you for, as well as the other; to me your conduct wanted not any justification or explanation. I am fully Satisfied that you have weighed every measure, looking much further into concequences than those who censure and condemn. Yet I like to have some reasons to give to those who feel anxious upon...
The Saturday after you left Boston, I went to Town, and brought up George. he went the next week to his uncle Cranch’s, and goes daily to school to mr Whitney. he appears well pleased, and learns to the Satisfaction of mr Whitney as I hear, who has put him into Lattin, which George Says is not so hard as French, in his French Bible his Aunt hears him daily. he is a Good Boy, save now and then,...
I received your Letter from Providence and rejoiced in the favorable account you gave of your journey thus far, but a Letter Since received by your Sister dated at Newark gave us all much anxiety upon Mrs Adams’s account. We hope her disorder was only occasiond by over fatigue; and that a little rest would restore her. She is a veteran in journeying, and has frequently gone through what would...
Your affectionate Letter of December 19th reach’d me a few days since, and found me and the rest of the family in good Health, and Spirits, blessing for which we ought to be truly thankfull. as all the Gifts of providence are enhanced and enjoyed with tenfold pleasure when attended by them, we can never so justly appreciate the blessing we enjoy, as when we are deprived of them. I was glad to...
I fully designd writing to you so that my Letter should have reachd you at Washington, but ten days of very severe sickness has prevented me from holding a pen, and now I do it against many expostulations. I duly received your two kind Letters, and thank you for them. Mrs Adams Caroline and the two Boys made me a very pleasent visit of a fortnight. I enjoyd their society in my usual health,...
I did not expect a very frequent correspondence with you when you left me; however interested we each of us feel in the happiness and prosperity of our Country, there is little hope that observation, upon the measures pursued, or anxiety for the event of them, would alter or amend them: The Group which composed the National Counsels as is certainly such an one, as has not heretofore been...
Your Letter of march the 10th is before me; your Brother informs me that he has one of April. It is true my dear Son, that I have read with much interest, and Sincere pleasure, your Letters to your Brother Thomas, and with many others, have been highly entertaind with your journey into Silicia. Whilst those letters convey usefull information, to the Merchant, the Mechanic, and the Farmer, they...
We have this day quite and old fashinnd Snow Storm, after an unusual pleasent Feb’ry. the Snow is much deeper and more drifted than we have had, for several winters. the wind very high at NorthEast; from our parlour windows the stone walls are not to be Seen. it began yesterday noon to snow. After evening, the wind rose, and has continued through the night, and to this time without abatement....
A1tho I have not so frequently written to you It has not been oweing to Your having been less frequently in my Thoughts than formerly; I found it so difficult to determine from a partial view, what were the wisest and best measures for the government to pursue, in a day so dark, and in times so perilious, that Silence was best for me, after having once given my opinion upon a subject where we...
We have not a printer in Boston who gives us any of the debates in either house of Congress: I have seen the National intelligencer for a few weeks past, I there read the debate which I presume was the cause of dr Eustice writing to mr. Jos’ Hall the following, “You will probably have heard of the Bold an independant manner in which JQA. voted away from his party, having gained credit with us...
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...
I think it is full time to take my pen and inquire after your Health, and to assure you that I should not have been this long silent if I had not known that Mrs Adams was a constant and punctual correspondent, and would inform you of the welfare of herself and children. John has made me a visit of a couple of weeks; on Saturday I brought out George in hopes that a change of air; and a little...
As Congress are now up for this Season, you will be thinking of returning as soon as the Roads will permit, and that will be soon, unless we should have a renewal of winter. the two last weeks of Feb’ry and March as far as it is gone, has been very fine weather. uncommonly so, the grass springs, and the trees bud, too soon I fear for a climate so liable to sudden changes; I fear you will not...
I take it for granted that you will neither in public or private Life do any thing which you are unwilling to own, or to affix your Name. I write to ask you if uninvited you attended the Caucus at Washington of which mr Bradley was President? It is not the scandalous publication in Jacksons Register at Philadelphia, which has induced me to ask this question, but because I have considerd it as...
I address you jointly and congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since you commenced your journey I hope e’er this day, you have reached washington in safety , with your dear little Boy; for whose Safety, I was not a little anxious through so long and fatigueing a journey. We had the pleasure to receive a Letter from you, informing us of your arrival at New york— The week after you...
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
Your Letter of Jan’ry 6 I received last Evening. your Children are very well, and very well taken care of. so do not give yourself any anxious solisitude about them. I believe they are much better off than they could have been at any boarding House in washington, where they must have been confined in some degree; or have mixd with improper persons; with respect to John, the Child enjoys...
Altho I have not written to you since the return of your Husband to Quincy, I have had the pleasure of hearing weekly from you through him; and of learning that you, and the Children are well. I want to see the dear Boys, and regret that they are like to be so long seperated from me. George will forget us and John cannot know us. I have a great opinion of childrens being early attached to...
The mountains have vanished, and the ground is again bare in most places. the roads are excessive rough, and the weather uncommonly cold for March. I hope it will Soften & the Roads become smoother, before Saturday when I shall send in the carriage for you. I do not think that George will have the Measles. I thought that voyage to England, would end in a matrimonial engagement in Boston I wish...
I received your Letter of december 6th on the 14th and was very glad to hear of your safe arrival at washington; the journey at this Season when the days are so short must always be fatigueing. It must have been less so to you than it would have been with the children, tho I doubt not you must miss them very much. they are very well. John is as thick as he is long, has out grown his cloaths....
I congratulate you my dear Louissa, that our loss is to be your gain. mr Adams leaves us on tuesday for washington, where I hope he will arrive in safety, and have a joyfull meeting with his family. I know from frequent experience how painfull it is to be thus seperated—I hope when he returns next Spring that you will be able to come with him, and that we may make Quincy an agreable residence...
I received your favour of Novbr 20th and rejoiced to learn that you reachd Washington in safety with your young Charge. it is an important undertaking to travel such a distance with so young a Baby, by land and by water, but you have been accustomed to it, and therefore feel less embarressd with it than others would be. the little fellow seems to be Born for deeds of greater hardihood than his...
It is a long time since I wrote you, or rather since I sent a Letter, for an unfinished one has lain by so long that like an old Almanack it is out of date. The writing Spirit is not always present, and it is shy and coy. If you do not frequently solisit it, neglect is sure to be followed by indifference, and indifference by disgust; I need not any other prompter at present than the desire I...
Inclosed you have a Letter, to mr Rutledge which you may if you like send to your Brother if you think it will be of any service to him. We yesterday received a few lines from mr Adams of the 14th from which I learnt you were all in tolerable Health, I want to know if his cough has left him, and whether he has any thing of the Rheumatism in his Limbs. I would have him pay particular attention...
I shall begin my Letter by putting your mind at ease respecting your children, who are both very well. George I saw yesterday quite in Raptures; his uncle Cranch had made him a little Sled with a small box upon the top; similar to one which Dexter had made John; and which employs half his time. Sometimes to draw about miss Juno, who seems to like the ride very well, and sits in it as grave and...
I received two days since your Letter of Febry th 11. it containd information the most agreable that mr Adams was in better Health and Spirits is cheering news to me. I feared through want of attention to himself that his cough would fix upon his Lungs, and produce very allarming concequences—the time is fast approaching when Congress must rise, whether they have done good, or whether they...
your Letter of Feb’ry I duly recived, and Should Sooner have replied to it, but I wished to consider the subject of it maturely, and to give you the best advise in my power. If you have a prospect that you can be supplied with a number of Boarders in the spring, it will be adviseable for you to continue your House, but you certainly cannot make it answer with one only. commencing in winter...
I will not delay a Single hour to replie to your Letter of Jan’ry 8th just received, and to acknowledg the receipt of yours of Nov’br which ought not to have lain so long unanswerd. Since mrs Smith has been with me, I have not been in the habit of writing much, and when ever a reluctance to the pen commences, it increases with time, untill it becomes urksome. I know I ought to have written to...