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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I know not how to acknowledge the date of your last Letter to me. one thing I know, that it is not so ancient as the date of our Friendship, that commenced with our first knowledge of each other, and has Subsisted undiminished through all the various Scenes through which each of us have passed I may add in a long Life in a checkerd State from the juvenile days of Caliope & diana, to the...
Yesterday your father received a letter from William. We rejoice to learn that you are well; and I have the pleasure to inform that we are all getting better, and that I intend to dine below to-day. I congratulate you that the embargo is like to be raised. I hope the non-intercourse bill will be lost; and the merchantmen send out frigates to convoy the trade, molest no one, and defend...
The Saturday after you left Boston, I went to Town, and brought up George. he went the next week to his uncle Cranch’s, and goes daily to school to mr Whitney. he appears well pleased, and learns to the Satisfaction of mr Whitney as I hear, who has put him into Lattin, which George Says is not so hard as French, in his French Bible his Aunt hears him daily. he is a Good Boy, save now and then,...
I will write you a line the first I have attempted, to tell you I am getting better I hope tho very slowly. I am very weak, and not a little anxious to hear how my dear Abigail is. sick as I have been I regret that she is from home, tho I doubt not you will receive every attention and kindness, but you must das assistance, and have a home, more particularly so in Sickness—as soon as you think...
I have not written to you this year! and this is the second month of it, and let us ask the rising year, now open to our view yet wrapped in darkness, whither dost thou lead? Let cheerful hope receive the welcome guest, gratefully recollecting the many blessings of the past year, and committing ourselves to the wise and overruling providence, who suffers not a sparrow to fall to the ground...
my Son J Q Adams has an opportunity of employing the Sum I have which is payd of Eight pr Cent Stock. will you be so good as to draw Such an order as will enable him to receive it, and inclose it to me I Shall go to Town tomorrow he will leave Boston on monday DNDAR .
Those of the family who could not attend yesterday at Cambridge yesterday as well as those who did, are very desirious of reading the lecture. if you will be so good as to let William take it, to day, I will return it on Monday. I wish a few of the Reviews if you can spair them. I carried to Town yesterday your Shirt overalls & waistcoat & handkerchiefs which you left here. as mrs Adams was...
I always feel most disposed to write when I have just received a Letter. Yet that is not the case now, but what is very similar to it. I have just read one from you to your Grandfather in which you mention Judge Bensons having commenced a course of Law Lectures and express a wonder at what could be his object as he does not receive any pecuniary reward. From the knowledge I have of Judge...
What is the reason I do not get a Letter from my Mother I think I hear you say? Why I will tell you Child. I have Sat down more than once, got through one page, been interrupted, laid it by—untill it seemd of no value. I love to be by myself when I write and that is a difficult thing in the winter season. the parlour your Father occupies all the forenoon in reading or writing. it is proper he...
I am indebted to you for two Letters one of the last bearing date Novbr 20th. & 24th. I am always rejoiced to see your handwriting, altho the contents of your Letters some times give me pain, and none more so than those which contain an Idea that your Relatives, and Friends have not exerted themselves for you as they might have done. With respect to william. Your Father himself went to Town:...
I can scarcly belive that I have not written to my dear Girl for so long a time as two months, yet upon opening her Letter in replie to mine, I find it bears Date 28 Sep’br This Letter I hope will receive a double welcome for it incloses one from your Friend which of them I know not, but it came under cover to your Grandpappa this week. Your Aunt E. Adams has been sick almost ever since she...
Your Letter of Sepbr 25 together with Carolines came safe to hand, but I have been in a kind of Turmoil ever since, and never felt retired, or quiet enough to sit down to my pen. It is a great misfortune to me that I cannot see to write in an Evening, without injury to my Eyes. your Aunt Cranch’s sickness has lain heavey at my heart. She is I hope recovering, but she has been much broken down....
I began a Letter to you on Sunday last in which I informed you that your Sister S. Adams and Abbe arrived here the week before in good health & spirits, that they left your Mother Sisters & Son well. John has written me a Letter by them which is the first I have received from them him, tho he frequently writes to his Grandfather. I shall not fail replying to him. Susan has been a month at...
Shall we ever have the pleasure of a visit from you at Quincy. I can Scarcly credit that you Should be so intirely weaned from a place, and Friends whom you once loved and esteemed. I know your avocations are numerous—your time fully occupied, but you may have leisure to visit the Atheneum, when your Friends here are to be no more seen. your uncle and Aunt Cranch have both been very sick. your...
Your Apology for not having written before was accepted by your grandmother. To be attentive to our guests is not only true kindness, but true politeness: for if there is a virtue which is its own reward, hospitality is that virtue. We remember slight attentions, after we have forgotten great benefits; sweetness of temper, easiness of behaviour, and kindness of disposition, are peculiarly...
Do you know how long a time has elapsed since you wrote a single line to your Mother? You did not use to be thus neglectfull of your pen: I am myself frequently tardy, but I believe unless the post has failed: that I have written twice, Since I recieved a Letter from you. Caroline has written once to me: and once to Susan so that my mind has been releived from the apprehension that you were...
Do you know my Dear Daughter that the date of your last Letter was the 3 of June, since which I have not received a line from you. Perhaps you may have been occupied as I have been by a large family—Providence has been so bountifull to us this Season in the rich and ample supply of Grass, that we can neither procure sufficient hands to cut it; or Barns ample large enough to contain it. we have...
Here we are Sitting by a good fire in the parlour, and wearing, our winter coats to meeting, whilst our windows are coverd with a profusion of roses, our Wall’s decorated with flowers expanding their Beauties to the cold Northern blast, which rudely lacerates their delicate texture, unmindfull of their Beauty; and headless of their fragrance. I rose the other morning delighted with the visit I...
Your letter of May the 8th, your grandpapa brought home with him from church, on Sunday the 20th; owing to sickness I was not able to go, and am yet confined to my chamber. My fever and cough are both leaving me, and I hope a few days more will give me health sufficient to enjoy the fine season. I have been reading a novel called the Wild Irish Girl. Why the term wild is given, I know not,...
When confined to my Chamber as I am at present by indisposition, I get more leisure for writing than when occupied employd with my family occupations. tho for two day my Head has sufferd such severe pain that I could neither write or read. to day I feel much releived, and if neither chills or fever attack me to day, I shall hope to be below stairs in a day or two. I have enjoyd for a year past...
I took my pen to write to you this morning in a placid temper of mind; the news papers of yesterday lay by me, which I had not lookd into comeing late last evening from Boston: papers bearing the title of Federal. I found in them such a bitter Spirit of Party, such uncandid constructions, such false conclusion and, such mean crinching to one power, and such bigg Blustering against an other,...
A1tho I have not so frequently written to you It has not been oweing to Your having been less frequently in my Thoughts than formerly; I found it so difficult to determine from a partial view, what were the wisest and best measures for the government to pursue, in a day so dark, and in times so perilious, that Silence was best for me, after having once given my opinion upon a subject where we...
It is So long since I received a Letter from you; that I am anxious to hear from you. I have written twice Since, once before william left us; and once Since. I hope he has arrived in health and Safety; we received his Letter from Albany and heard by way of miss Hinkly, that his visit to Govenour Strong was very pleasing to the Govenour. I feel anxious for him the times are very discourageing...
It is a long time since I wrote you, or rather since I sent a Letter, for an unfinished one has lain by so long that like an old Almanack it is out of date. The writing Spirit is not always present, and it is shy and coy. If you do not frequently solisit it, neglect is sure to be followed by indifference, and indifference by disgust; I need not any other prompter at present than the desire I...
your Letter begun at wWashington and finishd at Baltimore I received a few days since read and wept over it, most tenderly sympathizing in the Sorrow which have harrowd up the Bosom of my Friend since we last parted. I had heard of your Safe arrival at Washington and found from the papers and from private Friends that the Judge had been so well as to constantly to attend court. This was so...
William left us on thursday, and on fryday set his face towards you. we parted with him, with much reluctance his whole conduct has been so Satisfactory to all of us, that our Blessings and good wishes will follow him, where ever he goes, or what ever his destination in Life may be. to the reading Law he appeard averse; and he offerd weighty reasons against it. the bent of his mind appears to...
William has been so punctual in writing to you every week, that I have been more remiss. I cannot write in an Evening; the only time in which I feel a disposition to use my pen is the forenoon. You know how buisily that is generally occupied, and more so now Louisa is in Boston, and the Farm buisness is just commencing. mrs dexter is going to housekeeping. I know not where to supply her place,...
I take it for granted that you will neither in public or private Life do any thing which you are unwilling to own, or to affix your Name. I write to ask you if uninvited you attended the Caucus at Washington of which mr Bradley was President? It is not the scandalous publication in Jacksons Register at Philadelphia, which has induced me to ask this question, but because I have considerd it as...
I will not delay a single hour to replie to your Letter of Jan’ry 8th just recived, and to acknowledge the receipt of that of Novbr which ought not to have lain so long unanswerd; Since Mrs Smith has been with me I have not been in the habit of writing, and when once a reluctance to the pen commences, it increases by time with time untill it becomes urksome. I know I ought to have written to...
To-morrow will be a fortnight since you left me; I have watched the weather with much solicitude, and when we had snow, as we had the Thursday after you set out, I hoped it might speed your journey, provided there should not be too great a quantity; although the storm was severe and cold on Saturday, it was pleasant sleighing. I flattered myself we should enjoy it for a week or ten days, but...