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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Jefferson Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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I address you jointly and congratulate you upon the fine weather we have had since you commenced your journey I hope e’er this day, you have reached washington in safety , with your dear little Boy; for whose Safety, I was not a little anxious through so long and fatigueing a journey. We had the pleasure to receive a Letter from you, informing us of your arrival at New york— The week after you...
The reason that you did not receive a Letter from me when you arrived at Philadelphia, was oweing to my being so sick that I could not write. I got your Brother to write, but not so soon as I should, if I had been able. as soon as I could hold my pen I wrote you a few lines, since which I have received your Letter from Newyork; I have rejoiced in the fine weather which has followed you ever...
I received yesterday your Letter of Novbr 27th. and was rejoiced to learn that you and the Children were well. I was just contemplating writing a Letter to my son to chide him for not writing to inform me, how George was grown, and improved, what he said when he saw his pappa again, and how mister John came on, whether he is as grave as his Brother George was how Master Georges socks fitted...
Your Letter of Jan’ry 6 I received last Evening. your Children are very well, and very well taken care of. so do not give yourself any anxious solisitude about them. I believe they are much better off than they could have been at any boarding House in washington, where they must have been confined in some degree; or have mixd with improper persons; with respect to John, the Child enjoys...
Altho I have not written to you since the return of your Husband to Quincy, I have had the pleasure of hearing weekly from you through him; and of learning that you, and the Children are well. I want to see the dear Boys, and regret that they are like to be so long seperated from me. George will forget us and John cannot know us. I have a great opinion of childrens being early attached to...
The mountains have vanished, and the ground is again bare in most places. the roads are excessive rough, and the weather uncommonly cold for March. I hope it will Soften & the Roads become smoother, before Saturday when I shall send in the carriage for you. I do not think that George will have the Measles. I thought that voyage to England, would end in a matrimonial engagement in Boston I wish...
I received your Letter of december 6th on the 14th and was very glad to hear of your safe arrival at washington; the journey at this Season when the days are so short must always be fatigueing. It must have been less so to you than it would have been with the children, tho I doubt not you must miss them very much. they are very well. John is as thick as he is long, has out grown his cloaths....
I congratulate you my dear Louissa, that our loss is to be your gain. mr Adams leaves us on tuesday for washington, where I hope he will arrive in safety, and have a joyfull meeting with his family. I know from frequent experience how painfull it is to be thus seperated—I hope when he returns next Spring that you will be able to come with him, and that we may make Quincy an agreable residence...
I received your favour of Novbr 20th and rejoiced to learn that you reachd Washington in safety with your young Charge. it is an important undertaking to travel such a distance with so young a Baby, by land and by water, but you have been accustomed to it, and therefore feel less embarressd with it than others would be. the little fellow seems to be Born for deeds of greater hardihood than his...
It is a long time since I wrote you, or rather since I sent a Letter, for an unfinished one has lain by so long that like an old Almanack it is out of date. The writing Spirit is not always present, and it is shy and coy. If you do not frequently solisit it, neglect is sure to be followed by indifference, and indifference by disgust; I need not any other prompter at present than the desire I...
Inclosed you have a Letter, to mr Rutledge which you may if you like send to your Brother if you think it will be of any service to him. We yesterday received a few lines from mr Adams of the 14th from which I learnt you were all in tolerable Health, I want to know if his cough has left him, and whether he has any thing of the Rheumatism in his Limbs. I would have him pay particular attention...
I shall begin my Letter by putting your mind at ease respecting your children, who are both very well. George I saw yesterday quite in Raptures; his uncle Cranch had made him a little Sled with a small box upon the top; similar to one which Dexter had made John; and which employs half his time. Sometimes to draw about miss Juno, who seems to like the ride very well, and sits in it as grave and...
I received two days since your Letter of Febry th 11. it containd information the most agreable that mr Adams was in better Health and Spirits is cheering news to me. I feared through want of attention to himself that his cough would fix upon his Lungs, and produce very allarming concequences—the time is fast approaching when Congress must rise, whether they have done good, or whether they...