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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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I arrived here on Sunday last, and without meeting with any accident worth noticing, except losing ourselves when we left Baltimore, and going eight or nine miles on the Frederick road, by which means we were obliged to go the other eight through woods, where we wandered two hours without finding a guide, or the path. Fortunately, a straggling black came up with us, and we engaged him as a...
I reachd this city on Sunday Evening and have waited one day to rest myself and Horses. my health is but feeble and a little over fatigue deprives me of my rest—I Shall Sit off this morning, but cannot make more than 25 or 30 miles a day. I Shall endeavour to reach Washington on Saturday if the Weather will permit. it would be an ease to the horses if Curry could come half way to Baltimore and...
I arrived in this City last Evening & came to the old House now occupied by Francis as an Hotel. Tho the furniture and arrangment of the House is changed I feel more at home here than I should any where else in the city, and when Sitting with my son & other friends who call to see me, I can scarc e ly persuade myself, that tomorrow I must quit it, for an unknown and an unseen abode. My Journey...
You will forgive me my Dear sister that I spaired both you and my Self the pain of a formal leave, and that I left you without bidding you an adieu. I never was so divided between Duty, and affection. the desire I had to remain with you, and the necessity I was under to commence a long and tedious journey at this late Season of the Year—my Heart was rent with the distrest Situation of yourself...
after a Sleepless night I begin my journey with an anxious mind, tho not a desponding one. my dear Sister is I hope out of danger, tho So low and weak as not to be able either to stand or walk. mrs Norten whom we had all burried in our expectations is getting up again. Thus have I cause of comfort that Death has not enterd their doors Whilst in my own family I have cause to mourn the Death of...
I wrote you in my last how much I was dissapointed in not being able to visit you my dear Sister, but if I had not been obliged to have prepared for my Journey the Situation of our dear Sister and family, as well as of my own would have prevented me, tho a kind providence has preserved the Life of our Sister hitherto, and restored mrs Norten to our prayers, So far as to give us hopes of her...
Inclosed is a paper I promised in a former Letter— I shall not write to Washington untill I get on my journey, but you may write under cover to col Smith, and let me know when the president was in Philadelphia. I do not get any news papers from thence now— Your affectionate / Mother NRU .
I have not written to you since you left me, but as I know you must feel anxious to hear—I write tho it will but add to your apprehensions; my own Health has mended, tho the weather has been so wet and unpleasent that I have not dared to venture out, not even to see my dear sister in her sickness and distress. She is very low with the fever confined to her Bed. Katy Gannet taken down, & George...
I received your two favours one of 9 and the other of 13th. I am sorry that you should have felt yourself so wounded tho to be assailed in the house of our Friends is a calamity of the bitterest kind; the President has had no common share of it in this State. Those who have been firm supporters of the administration of Washington, whose voices and pens have uniformly been employed in h olding...
I received your Letter inclosing the one from your Brother—I do not find the extract you mention in Wayne Paper. I would have had it inserted in I. Russels before I leave here, but that I know not how it may be introduced in the US Gazet, and it would not be & proper they should clash. but if there is any hesitation upon the Subject in Philadelphia, there will not be any here. I well remember...
First I would inform you that B Adams is we hope, out of danger; his reason is returnd pretty clearly he is not yet permitted to leave his Chamber—I congratulate the Philadelphians that they have this Year escaped the pestilence. it is now so late in the Season that I hope they may wholy escape Since I was first an inhabitant of this place I never knew it So Sickly as it has been this Summer....
I thank you for your valuable and much esteemed favour of Sep’br. 28th the President will leave me tomorrow and I shall follow him in a week if possible; but the determination was made only on fryday the 8th; at a time too when I had been a week confined to my Room by an attack of the old intermitting fever—from which I hope I am now recovering. But it requires some resolution to undertake a...
I received yours of Sep’br. 18th. I have melancholy intelligence to communicate to you respecting poor B. Adams. Last week of an Evening he had put a Horse into a Waggon for the purpose of conveying three quarters of Beaf to a Neighbours. The Horse was restiff, and he gave him a Whip upon which he started, threw him down, and the wheel went over one Side of his face so as to break the jaw...
Your Letter by Mr Rogers did not reach me untill the last week. The Crisis which I have long apprehended is arrived and brought with it the misiry I foresaw, but could not avert. All that intreaties, and pursuation could affect, I have attempted. I have conjured the unhappy Man by all that is dear; Honour, reputation, and Fame, his Family and Friends, to desist, and to strive to regain what he...
I have not written you a line my dear son since I return’d to this place, now three months; I felt almost discouraged from writing, by not having received a line from you, for a very long period of time. Yours of Febry 19th at last reachd me in the month of july, and two days Since I received your favour of May 25th, for which accept my fervent thanks. the 17 of the present Month will compleat...
I have been determined for several weeks to write to you, but one avocation after an other, has calld of my attention and prevented me. I was seizd with a voilent fever soon after my return, and confined to my bed during the absence of the President. he found me upon his return confined to my Chamber, and unable to leave it for some time. Since my recovery I have enjoy’d better Health, and...
I have not written to you Since I received yours of the 19th, and 20th by your Friend’s. I was from Home when they came up and deliverd your Letters, but your Father saw them, and invited them to dine with us on tuesday last, which they did. I found them agreable young men, and your Friends think they trace a likeness of your person in mr Neal. They profess to be much pleased with their Tour....
I received your kind Letter by mr Peabody and thank you most Sincerely for it. I did not know that you had been so very Sick untill I Saw a Letter from you to mrs Foster. you my Dear Sister certainly take too great a charge upon you; I know that you delight in doing good, and communicating, that as our good Father used to Say, he had rather be worn out, than Rot out; but your constitution is...
on the 23d of June I wrote you a Letter, and one to your Father, addressing it to him in Philadelphia, and in his absence to be opened by you. I was much mortified to find it returnd again to Quincy, not so much for what it containd, as the appearence of my having neglected to write to you; your last Letter found me upon a bed of sickness wholy unable to write. The Hot weather brought on a...
I have not taken my pen to write you a line before since my return, tho I have daily intended it. You know I must necessarily have many avocations upon first comeing home, beside the constant interruptions from company; I was happy to learn as I did a few days since by your Letter of June the 1st that you had returnd in safety to the city improved in health. God grant that it may be continued...
Mr Gore came out this afternoon to see me, and informd me that mr Dexter proposed to sit out tomorrow for Washington. by him I embrace the earliest opportunity of informing you of my safe arrival at Quincy on Saturday the last day of May, in good health tho some thing fatigued I got on very well, met with no accident, Horses all in good order. I found our Friends here well. the Hill looks very...
Detained here by a cold North East rain, I write to inform you I am thus far on my journey to Quincy 100 44 miles from Philadelphia which I left this day week in the afternoon; I tarried one day in N York and have taken Little Susan on with me. I went to the incampment upon Scotch Plains and lodged one night in the Col’s Log House, which I found quite a comfortable habitation. mrs. Smith was...
I reachd this City in good Health last evening. I have not felt dissagreable at any place upon My Journey through absence of any Gentleman Attendent, except at this North River I found a Boat just going off, With Several Horses and Chaises on board, my own Carriage could not go—I saw none but Irishmen by their Tongues going on Board, decent looking people however. the ferryman, appeard civil...
The rain comeing on the morning I left Bristol, I reachd about noon and remaind there untill yesterday morning when I procceeded to Brunswick Soon after I got there the Col. & Major Ripley arrived, and informd me that mrs. Smith would expect me to dinner. We accordingly sit out and got here about 2 oclock. The Col. was not able to be absent as Gen’ll. Hamilton was on his way to Capp Camp—and...
we reachd this place at half after Six we found the old inhabitants gone, the new inn keepers name Tombes, the people civil and obligeing, every thing very neat Jackson drove very well. Farmer and Favorite lazy Traveller & ceasar brisk I am fully of the mind that a middle Size Horse travels with more ease to himself, and pleasure to the driver. we shall get on Slowly. I had rather have the...
You judged right my dear Madam, I do most sincerely rejoice in your prosperity and returning happiness, which to my frequent sorrow, I saw often overshadowd by an anxious and Distressed mind during your late visit; it was a silent unobtruding grieff grief which renderd it the more affecting; nor were the gratefull feelings of your Heart less intresting, upon an occasion which gave more...
I received yesterday your kind and Friendly Letter for which accept my thanks. The interest you have taken from the best of motives in what you conceive to be the happiness and prosperity of the Country is deserving well of it; when plans were so deeply lade so deliberately carried into Execution, names so well known & so dear to very many of the inhabitants of your State and city, Men whom...
I have been expecting to get a Letter from you for Several days: I am the more anxious to hear from you as you wrote me in your last, that mr Cranch had got one of his bad Colds. I intended to have left this city to day, but the president having determined to visit Washington I could not think of taking the Coachman who has experience of his horses and is a sober good man. tho the president...
I could not but regreet that we had not the pleasure of Seeing you in Philadelphia, as you got so near. But we could not prevail upon mrs Smith to Stay any longer. I hope to have the Satisfaction of Seeing you Soon at Quincy. I shall leave here on monday. the President will Sit out next week for Washington. I have to trouble you again with an other Bill of Laden. the chairs mentiond in it be...
We are still without Letters from you. The Secretary of State received one dated in December; but no private Letter has reached any of your Family of a later date than early in Nov’br, now six months. I have noticed by the last English papers that many mails were due from Hamburgh. I fear that Letters from you have been intercepted, or stoped. I have written to you a Number of times since I...