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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Period="Adams Presidency"
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My Son having Sent me a coppy of your valuable Book, the President has read it with great Satisfaction and pleasure; I have not as yet been able to go through the whole of it, myself having resignd it into the hands of miss Hannah Adams the Authoriss of a Work entitled “a veiw of Religious opinions”—She is about republishing the third Edition of that work with considerable additions, and Some...
I need not put up the petition of Popes “teach me to feel an others woe” for I have mostSsincerely enterd into your affliction during your long residence at Washington, and thank heaven for your cause of rejoicing—I dared not write to you and feared the arrival of every mail might bring me the melancholy tidings we all so much dreaded, but through the interposition of a bountifull providence,...
it would be if made. we must be convinced, as well as the people of in general, that the convention taken all together is highly advantageous to the Country; Let then a thinking and impartial Man Compare the Situation of the united States on the 4 of March 1797 when the President assumed the office of their first executive magistrate with their Situation on the Same day 1801, when those...
a Contrast, which they may lament, but cannot now remedy. to a total and final relinquishment of publick Life, we retire to the rural Scenes of Quincy; not to become querilious with the world, not to molest or disturb the administration of the new Government, if it adopts not measures ruinous to the Country, but hopeing for better prospects than present themselves now to our view—that we may...
I write you once more from this city. the Trenton River is impassable and has prevented my sitting out. we hope however that the Rain may clear it. I Sent Townsend of to day; I have heard Some of the democratic rejoicing such as Ringing Bells & fireing cannon; what an inconsistancy said a Lady to me to day, the Bells of Christ Church ringing peals of rejoicing for an Infidel president! The...
I reachd this city on tuesday Evening. at Baltimore Leiut Parker came in to see me, and offerd his service to me; I had engaged a carriage of Evans to take me here with good horses and a carefull driver, for which I was to give him 80 dollars or in proportion if I could not get across the Susquahannah I offerd mr Parker a seat with me. he was very usefull to me and exerted himself very much or...
I wrote to you last Evening requesting You to meet me at the Susquahanah; but I did not reflect that it was two days Journey. this Evening Leiut partner has arrived and has tenderd me his Services; mr Evans furnishes me with a carriage to philadelphia provided we can cross the River if I cannot get over, I must depend upon the chapter of chances—if I can get over I expect to be in on tuesday....
Altho I was much fatigued last Evening, I wrote a few lines to the President to let him know we were safely housed. The Roads were so bad that the Mail tho two hours before us in the morning did not get in untill half an hour after us, and there was not any Mail from Philadelphia. We took colds all of us; I have a very Soar throat and Louisa a Stiff neck. Susan this morning complaind her...
I arrived here about half after Six, without any accident, but beat and bang’d enough I do not wish for the present, a severer punishment to the Jacobins & half feds who have Sent me home at this Season, than to travel the Roads in the San Culot Stile just now; the Roads were hard frozen points up, all the way. We were 4 hours making our first Stage, and then commenced a voilent Snow Storm....
I suppose the reason why I have not had a Letter from you for a long time, arrises from your expectation that I am upon my Journey; the Roads have been represented to me as so intolerable bad, and I know them to be so, that I have been prevaild upon to remain longer than I designd. I now think I shall stay untill after the 13th of Feby, the great important day which may in its concequences...
The Roads and Weather prevent my leaving this place this day as I had designd; mrs Cushing and Otis advise me to take lodgings at mr Stall’s in 3d street, your former lodgings I shall want a chamber with two Beds and one Bed for a man Servant; I always chuse to have my maid and Susan Sleep in the Room with me. She has got the hooping cough. I hope the worst part of it is over. When I get to...
a Conversation at table between mrs A—— and mr J——n last thursday. mr J. Pray who is that Gentleman who sits next but one to the president? That is mr Waln of pennsilvana. I never Saw him to know him before. pray who is the next? that is mr Ho l mes you surely know him, Smiling. he is a democrat. No I do not. mrs A. I know nearly all the gentlemen of Both houses, a few voilent demos. excepted...
Your Brother Thomas has performed the painfull office of announcing to you the death of your Brother Charles. with what a weight of sorrow is my bosom opprest, when I reflect, that he was cutt down in the bloom of Life, in the midst of his days. he is numberd with the dead; it becomes me in Silence to mourn; mourn over him living, I have for a long time, and now he is gone.—the tender...
I received yours of the 20th Instant. You will see how matters have gone in Senate respecting the Convention. Dean Swift in verses upon his own death, says of those who had predicted his death “They’d rather that the Dean should dye than there predictions prove a lie” So the party had rather the whole convention should be negatived and every thing put again at the mercy of France, than assent...
I received yours of the 9th. and thank you for the excellent matter which it contained. Mr Shaw has not sent you any papers from hence because the papers have not been worth transmitting, a tupor appears to have seized every person and the query what can be done? what will be done? what ought to be done? seems to be the questions, amongst the three parties, into which not only the Legislature...
I received your Letter of 9th, with respect to the Carriage I believe I did not stipulate for a false linning, but I would chuse to have one—I shall take a carriage from here to Philadelphia and have some prospect of being accompanied by mr Cranch who has buisness on, provided he can leave the new office, to which he is appointed, Commissoner of the City in the room of mr Scot who is dead I...
I received from you two kind Letters which I have not yet acknowledged; I am surprized to find that the frost & cold have not yet put a stop to the fever. I hope it will not be permitted to make a renewed visit, at the approach of the Summer with a severity never before experienced in our healthy and delightfull village—I cannot say that I have enjoy’d so much health this winter as the last. I...
I received your kind and friendly Letter of December 15 and thank you for your sympathetic condolence upon an event severely afflicting to a parent, in this case armed with many a barbed arrow, to infinite wisdom I bow in humble Submission, may the Chastning hand of providence be duly noticed by me, so that those Children who survive, may be doubly blessed to their parents. The year past is a...
I last Evening received yours of 30 december and would have you close the bargain with him Feilding for the Carriage provided the carriage has not been much used. he must put the Cypher A upon it and pray attend to the Steps. they must be Strong & come low down, I cannot mount high. my day is over for that, and my infirmitys require particuliar attention to that part of the carriage. a coach...
I have been much concerned for you ever since mr Shaw received your Letter. I should have written to you, but have been myself so unwell and so afflicted by sleepless Nights, that I am unfit for any active service through the day and Christmas & New year have had their calls upon me for more than common exertions. I have got through them, as well as some large dinners drawing Rooms I have...
I fear you will think your kind and obliging Letter of May 19th miscarried upon its passage, or that I have been very negligent in the acknowledgment of it. it made a very circuitous route. I had left Philadelphia before its arrival and it followd after the President to Washington so that it was a long time before I had the pleasure of learning from it, that mr Vaughan, yourself and Family...
There is a little painting which I should be glad to have Mr. Beal do as soon as he can, my kitchin floor & closet and the Sink which was omitted last year, and the Chamber over the best chamber which floor was only primed last year—I would have the Green Window blinds compleated which were to have been done last year, and have them painted; this will compleat the list of my repairs—and I do...
We have public worship every Sunday in the Representitive’s Chamber in the Capitol; I have just returnd from hearing Bishop Clagget deliver a discourse from those words in the Gospel of St Luke, Glory to God in the highest Peace on Earth, and Good Will to Men,” This is a doctrine full of Mercy and benevolence, of which the present generation appear little disposed to cultivate and...
I wrote to you not long since and inclosed a Bill of a hundred dollars which I hope you received. I inclose in this a Bill of ten dollars out of which you will please to pay two pounds 12 Shillings to Rube Harman which will be due to her in Janry for a quarters wages. I could wish my dear Sir that every Bill due might be discharged as you have the means; we shall then know what our income is,...
Well my dear Son, SCarolin has behaved as your Father always Said She would. the consequence to us personally is that we retire from public Life: for myself and family I have few regreats, at my age and with my bodily infirmities I shall be happier at Quincy. neither my habits, or my Education or inclinations have led me to an expensive Stile of living; So on that Score I have little to mourn...
I know my much loved Sister that you will mingle in my sorrow, and weep with me over the Grave of a poor unhappy child who cannot now add an other pang to those which have peirced my Heart for Several years past; cut off in the midst of his days, his years are numberd and finished; I hope my Supplications to heaven for him, that he might find mercy from his maker, may not have been in vain....
I have written to you my dear Sister twice since my arrival here. I know not but one of the Letters was in the lost mail I miss your pen which used to detail to me both public and private affairs. I have reason to bless God, that your Life is spared to your family, and Friends. I hope you will not be induced by any means to over exert yourself, or try your Strength beyond its bearing; a...
I feel as tho I was much further removed from all my Friends and Connections in at the State of Massachusetts, than one hundred and 50 miles from Philadelphia could make me. We have indeed come into a new part of the world, and amongst a new Set of inhabitants; it is a city in name, and that in a wilderness, a beautifull Spot by nature—but it must be commerce; and the introduction of a more...
I received your letter by Mr. Pintard. Two articles we are much distressed for; the one is bells, but the more important one is wood. Yet you cannot see wood for trees. No arrangement has been made, but by promises never performed, to supply the newcomers with fuel. Of the promises Briesler had received his full share. He had procured nine cords of wood; between six and seven of that was...
I arrived in this City on Sunday the 16th ult—having lost my way in the woods on Saturday in going from Baltimore we took the road to Frederick and got nine miles out of our road. you find nothing but a Forest & Woods on the way, for 16 and 18 miles not a village. here and there a thatchd cottage without a Single pane of glass—inhabited by Black’s—my intention was to have reachd Washington on...