George Washington Papers

From George Washington to Robert Morris, 8 March 1783

Head Quarters 8th March 1783


Very painfull Sensations are excited in my Mind by your Letter of the 27th of febry—It is impossible for me to express to you the Regret, with which I received the Information it contains.

I have often reflected, with much solicitude, upon the disagreeableness of your Situation & the Negligence of the several States, in not enabling you to do that Justice to the public Creditors, which their Demands require—I wish the Step you have taken, may sound the Alarm—to their inmost Souls, & rouse them to a just Sense of their own Interest, honor & Credit. But I must confess to you, that I have my fears—for as danger becomes further removd from them their feelings seem to be more callous to those noble Sentiments, with which I could wish to see them inspired—mutual Jealousies, local prejudices, & misapprehensions have taken such deep Root, as will not easily be removed.

Notwithstandg the Embarrassments which you have experienced, I was in hope that you would have continued your Efforts to the Close of the War, at Least—but if your Resolutions are absolutely fixed, I assure you I consider the Event, as one of the most unfortunate that could have fallen upon the States—& most sincerely deprecate the sad Consequences which I fear will follow—The Army, I am sure, [at the same Time] that they entertain the highest Sence of your Exertions will lament the Step you are obliged to take, as a most unfortunate Circumstance to them. I am &c.

DLC: Papers of George Washington.

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