George Washington Papers

To George Washington from Joseph Reed, 2 September 1780

Bloomsbury Sept. 2d 1780.

Dear Sir

I beg Leave to introduce to you Mr Sheill a Gentleman whose Enthusiasm in the American Cause has led him to this Country with a very considerable Fortune. Being disappointed in his Expectations of visiting the Camp in a military Capacity he wishes for an Oppy to pay his Respects to your Excellency as a private Gentleman.

Having dismiss’d the Militia collected the Military Stores & transferr’d to the Qr Master and Commissary all that remained of our Forage & Provisions I shall set out immediately for Philad[a] where your Excelly may depend on every Exertion in my Power for the general Benefit. I have the Satisfaction of leaving this Post better supplied than I found it having drawn from Bucks County a very considerable Proportion of Forage & Provisions which we have left here.

The deranged State of our publick Affairs is indeed much to be lamented & apprehended but I shall ever think they are to be ascribed to the Errors of the Year 1779 when the Prospect of a Winter Peace was evidently the Basis of all the Measures of Congress: & a few landed Men apprehensive of the Taxes on their Estates pour’d out the publick Money with such Profusion as to force the publick Bankruptcy—While they frustrated any Measure for restoring publick Credit either by a foreign Loan or a vigorous internal Exertion.

In calling out the Militia of the State on this Occasion I have endeavoured to conform to your Excellency’s Orders both in Letter & Spirit, they only regret that Circumstances have not permitted them to give you farther Proof of their Affection & Confidence. And on any future Occasion I trust they will be equally ready to obey your Commands. For my own Part (on every Account both publick & private) I shall be happy to give every possible Proof of the sincere Attachment & Respect with which I am Dear Sir Your most Obedt & Affect. Hbble Serv.

Jos: Reed

DLC: Papers of George Washington.

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