George Washington Papers

From George Washington to James Anderson, 8 September 1799

To James Anderson

Mount Vernon 8th Sep. 1799

Mr Anderson,

Mrs Washington passed a good night—is clear of a fever to day—and is taking the Bark—which I hope will prevent a return of it.1

I am much hurried, and pressed with one thing—or another, but do what humanity requires for Roberts: who ought not to have engaged, in the situation he is in, without first informing me of it. Doctr Craik is not now here, nor expected if Mrs Washington should not relapse; but the case may be stated to him against to morrow afternoon, when I shall send up to the Post Office. If it be found that he is not now—nor soon will be, in a condition to discharge the duties of a Miller, some other must, undoubtedly; be got; as I cannot loose the Fall work of the Mill. He may have medicine, or any thing else from hence.2

I did not send to the Post Office yesterday—of course no Papers came.

I was sorry to hear of your indisposition. I fear the charge with which you are entrusted, is too much for your health, and that to execute it properly, will rather increase than diminish your complaint. I shall therefore, so soon as company—sickness—and other circumstances will allow me time to digest my thoughts on this subject—express them to you in a more full & ample manner than I can do at present.3 I am always your friend &ca

Go: Washington

ALS, MBOS; ALS (letterpress copy), ViMtvL.

2William Roberts, whom GW had rehired in June as miller at Mount Vernon, had only just arrived. See GW to Roberts, 17 June and 29 August. Roberts, who was ill, was able to act as miller if at all for only a short time and was paid in “full” on 16 Nov. 1799 (Mount Vernon Ledger, 1799–1800 description begins Mount Vernon Farm Manager James Anderson’s Ledger, 1799–1800, including his working accounts with individuals, the farms and other operations such as the distillery, mill and fisheries. Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union, Virginia. description ends ).

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