George Washington Papers

To George Washington from Edmund Randolph, 25 January 1794

From Edmund Randolph

Philadelphia January 25. 1794


I had the honor of calling at your house, when Colo. Hamilton was with you, this morning. We have had two conversations upon the subject of the resolution, which, I understand, is not to be sent to you before monday.1

I am in possession of all Mr Morris’s letters; and was proceeding on them, when my servant brought me word, that my youngest son lies dangerously ill at German Town2—This compels me to go thither; from whence I shall endeavour to return to morrow morning. If, however, I should not; I shall go on with the letters, and perhaps with less interruption there, than here. I believe, that nothing has occurred to-day, or been received, which would require my attendance on you to-day.3 I have the honor, sir, to be with the highest respect yr mo. ob. serv.

Edm: Randolph


1The resolution under discussion asked GW to provide the U.S. Senate with copies of Gouverneur Morris’s official correspondence as the U.S. minister to France (U.S. Senate to GW, 24 Jan. 1794).

2Randolph had four children who lived to adulthood: Peyton (d. 1828), Susan Beverley (b. 1782), Edmonia Madison (b. 1787), and Lucy Nelson (b. 1789). The younger son mentioned here has not been identified and presumably died young, as did another son, John Jennings (1785–1786). After the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, Randolph maintained a residence for his wife and children in the nearby village of Germantown (Thomas Jefferson to Martha Jefferson Randolph, 1 Dec. 1793, Jefferson Papers description begins Julian P. Boyd et al., eds. The Papers of Thomas Jefferson. 40 vols. to date. Princeton, N.J., 1950—. description ends , 27:467–68).

3After his return to Philadelphia on 26 Jan., Randolph wrote two letters to GW that day concerning the recent Senate request (letters 1 & 2).

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