George Washington Papers

To George Washington from Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., 31 July 1775

From Jonathan Trumbull, Sr.

Lebanon [Conn.] 31st July 1775


By the Resolve in Congress of the 19th instant, it is recommended to the New England Colonies to compleat the Deficiences in the Regiments belonging to them respectively.1

I have not been informed of any Deficiency in the Number of Troops sent from Connecticut. It is recommended also to this Colony to compleat and send forward to the Camp before Boston as soon as possible the fourteen hundred men lately voted by our Assembly. The 25 instant I sent Orders to the Colonels of the last raised Regiments, to march forthwith to the Camp before Boston, by subdivisions if all were not in readiness. Expect many of the Companies will begin their March this Day—And that the whole will move forward very soon.2

The Honble President Hancock in his Favour of the 22nd instant informs, That you had recommended, and the Congress have appointed Mr Joseph Trumbull Commissary General of the American Army—I am also informed that you have taken Mr John Trumbull into your Service and Family—These instances of kindness shewn them justly claim my most grateful acknowledgements: A performance of their Duty answerable to your Expectation, will meet your approbation and continuance of Regard, and afford me peculiar satisfaction and Pleasure.

The Rose, Swan, and King Fisher ships of War, with a smal Tender the 25th instant came into the Harbour at New London, on the 27th some men landed near the Light House, broke off the Nutts and plugged up with old Files three or four Cannon—they sailed out again on Friday last. It is reported Mr Collector Stuart is packing up his effects, in Order to Leave that Port.3 I am, with great Truth and Regard Your Excellency’s most obedient and humble Servant

Jonth. Trumbull

ALS, DLC:GW; LB, Ct: Trumbull Papers. Joseph Reed docketed the ALS “Answd by Major Johnson.” The bearer was Obadiah Johnson of Connecticut.

1For this resolution, see JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds. Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. 34 vols. Washington, D.C., 1904–37. description ends , 2:191.

2For the arrival of the two new Connecticut regiments, see General Orders, 9 Aug. 1775, and Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., to GW, 15 Sept. 1775.

3The British vessels left New London on Saturday, 29 July. The cannon that were spiked on 27 July lay on the western point of the harbor (Connecticut Journal, and New-Haven Post-Boy, 2 Aug. 1775). Duncan Stewart (d. 1793) was collector of customs at New London from 1764 to 1776. Though a royal official and a Loyalist sympathizer, Stewart remained undisturbed at New London until July 1777, when he left for New York. He later became collector of customs in Bermuda.

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