James Madison Papers

James Monroe to James Madison, 15 February 1828

Oak hill Feby. 15th 1828.

Dear Sir

Another mail has arrived, since my last to you, without bringing me any letter from Judge Brooke. I infer, that you have experienc’d the same result. It is impossible therefore, to form any just estimate, of the time, when we shall receive the promised official communication. I am inform’d, by some, in whom I have perfect confidence, that the impression is daily gaining strength, that we mean to serve, & that our silence, if we intend to withdraw, operates to our prejudice, by sanctioning the use of our names, for the purpose contemplated, by those who brought us forward. In my last I proposd, that if we did not recieve the notification before saturday week, that we should withdraw ourselves from the nomination, by a communication, to be addressd to our fellow citizens of the State. On further reflection, I think that it will be most adviseable, to address it to Judge Brooke, founding it on the nomination, it being a fact universally known, and on which we have a right to act, without further notice. He would doubtless publish our letters, tho’ perhaps it would proper & necessary, to intimate by a private one, that we expected he would promptly do it. Should you approve this course, it would manifest kindness to him, & the party generally, not to send copies to the printers. We should be at liberty if he declined the publication, to communicate, or not, to whom we pleased, in which mode, it would become known to the community. I hope to hear from you as soon as possible, with your views on the subject.

Mrs. Monroe is still very seriously indisposed, tho’ we think her, as do the Phisicians who attend her, in a great measure out of danger. Her situation is however very delicate, & so much is she weakened by the attack, that we are very fearful of the result. With best regards to the family—your friend—

James Monroe


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