James Madison Papers

James Madison to James Monroe, 5 February 1828

Montpellier Feby. 5. 1828

Dear Sir

Yours of the 29th. Ult: was recd. by the last mail. I have not yet heard from Judge Brook, but may perhaps do so by the mail of this evening. The task imposed on us by the Convention is of so delicate a nature, that with their foreknowledge of our purpose, it ought to have been forborne. Your idea of alluding to the advantage of having the experienced Counsel of Ex. Presidts. in trying contingencies, may be more suited to you than to me, more of life being within your prospect than within mine. Should it however be taken well by the public, it will not square with the sentiments of those who extort an explanation; regarding as they profess to do, the actual crisis as the most serious that ever could appeal to patriotic considerations. I shall be obliged to rest my answer, on the long period of my public life, and the purpose, hitherto adhered to, with which I retired from it, and the relations in which I have stood to the present Competitors. Writing in haste I bid you an abrupt but affect. adieu

James Madison

RC (ViU); draft (DLC).

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