Thomas Jefferson Papers

From Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Mann Randolph, 19 February 1807

Washington Feb. 19. 07.

My dear Sir

Your letter of yesterday convinces me I have been guilty of an error, for which I take just blame to myself. really loving you as I would a son (for I protest I know no difference) I took it too much for granted you were as sensible of it as myself. conscious of my feelings towards you, I supposed you had the same consciousness, & therefore have been less attentive to the expressions of it. this I percieve has kept your mind in a state of disquietude which a real knolege of the truth would at once have dissipated.—I observe another circumstance in your letter. you suppose you have been represented to me as joining the Federalists to censure my public conduct, & you particularly mention Colo. Heath. never before was such an idea presented to my mind, no man’s republicanism can be better established than yours, and I have had constant proofs that you have generally approved of the course of our administration. this makes me suppose it probable you may have heard other things equally unfounded and against which we should be guarded. I declare to you on my honour that no mortal ever presumed to say to me one word disrespectful or disapproving of you, and that not a word or thought of that character ever escaped from me to any mortal. whatever therefore may have been said to you to the contrary is absolutely false, and shews there is some enemy who has endeavored to sow tares between us. however I hope we now have a mutual understanding & satisfaction, and that what has past is never more to be recollected. I shall view you, as I ever have done as one of the first objects of my affection, and add to it with truth assurances of the most perfect respect.

Th: Jefferson


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