Thomas Jefferson Papers

David Bailie Warden to Thomas Jefferson, 24 July 1811

From David Bailie Warden

Washington, 24 July, 1811—


I beg leave to inform you, that I have received the volume for general La Fayette. I shall set out tomorrow, for annapolis, where I expect to embark for France, with mr Barlow, in the course of a few days— the French Minister has received dispatches from France announcing the Emperors’ decision to admit into the ports of his Empire, the productions of the United States—It is stated, that the duties, on american articles, with the exception of tobacco, will be but one half of the late tariff—I am, Sir, with great respect, your ever obliged Servt

D. B. Warden

RC (DLC); at foot of text: “Thomas Jefferson Esquire”; endorsed by TJ as received 28 July 1811 and so recorded in SJL.

On 23 July 1811 the french minister, Louis Barbé Charles Sérurier, advised Secretary of State James Monroe of Napoleon’s decision to release all sequestered American vessels and to admit into French ports ships “coming from the United States, and loaded with merchandise the growth of the country” (ASP description begins American State Papers: Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States, 1832–61, 38 vols. description ends , Foreign Relations, 3:508–9).

Index Entries

  • Barlow, Joel; U.S. minister to France search
  • Destutt de Tracy, Antoine Louis Claude; Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s Spirit of Laws search
  • Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, marquis de; and Destutt de Tracy’s commentary on Montesquieu search
  • Monroe, James; as secretary of state search
  • Napoleon I, emperor of France; Continental System of search
  • Sérurier, Louis Barbé Charles; French minister to U.S. search
  • tobacco; French duties on search
  • Warden, David Bailie; and Destutt de Tracy’s work on Montesquieu search
  • Warden, David Bailie; letters from search