Thomas Jefferson Papers

To Thomas Jefferson from Tench Coxe, 23 July 1790

From Tench Coxe

Maiden lane. July 23d. 1790


Mr. Matthew Carey of Philadelphia wishes for the honor of conversing with you on the republication of the several treaties of the United States. Tho he cannot expect to insert them in his Museum by your Authority, he justly conceives it of great importance that they be strictly true copies. I proposed to have done myself the honor of waiting upon you with him to ask for him the favor of such aid to his object as it might be within your convenience and pleasure to afford; but have been prevented by an application for some papers for the use of the Legislature. I beg leave to say that Mr. Carey’s work has received the Sanction of several of the first names in the public and literary line in the united States, and that the republication of the Treaties in the Museum will place them in near two thousand hands in the several States. I have the honor to be, with the most respectful Consideration, Sir Your obedient Servant,

Tench Coxe

RC (DLC); endorsed as received 23 July 1790 and so recorded in SJL.

As a result of this first meeting with Mathew Carey, the American Museum or, Universal Magazine carried the texts of the definitive treaty of peace of 1783, the treaty of amity and commerce with Prussia of 1785, the consular convention with France of 1788, the treaty with the Creek Indians of 1790, and the Indian treaties negotiated at Hopewell in 1785 and 1786 (Aug. and Oct. issues, 1790, VIII, Appendix 2, p. 18–21, 21–7, 27–31, 50–4, 54–5, 56–7). Only the treaty with Prussia and that with the Creeks were attested by TJ.

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