Alexander Hamilton Papers

From Alexander Hamilton to William Loughton Smith, [10 April 1797]

To William Loughton Smith

[New York, April 10, 1797]

Dr Sir

Since my last to you1 I have perused with great satisfaction your little work on our Governments.2 I like the execution no less than the plan. If my health & leisure should permit, I would make some notes, but you cannot depend on it, as I am not only extremely occupied but in feeble health.

I send you My ideas of the course of Conduct proper in our present situation. It is unpleasant to me to know that I have for some time differed materially from many of my friends on public subjects;3 and I particularly regret that at the present critical juncture there is in my apprehension much danger that sensibility will be an overmatch for policy. We seem not to feel & reason as the Jacobins did when Great Britain insulted and injured us, though certainly we have at least as much need of a temperate conduct now as we had then. I only say, God Grant, that the public interest may not be sacrificed at the shrine of irritation & mistaken pride. Farewell

Affectly Yrs.


Wm. Smith Esq

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