Adams Papers

From Thomas Boylston Adams to William Smith Shaw, 14 December 1800

Philadelphia 14th: December 1800.

Dear William

I received your’s of the 10th: yesterday & am obliged to you for giving me so early information on the subject of the South Carolina election. I had the satisfaction of imparting it to many of my acquaintance, who looked very blue for the most part, though Some were much overjoyed. Our Sheriff Israel, was the first person who acquainted me with the letter from Genl Pinckney to Mr: Marshall, which he had been informed of by Dr: Leib, from Washington. It has fairly done us over, as the saying is. To me, you know it was not unexpected, but to many here it was. How happier is that man, who hangs not on the favor of the giddy & inconstant multitude!

The project you hint at as contemplated by the federalists will not take effect, unless some of the Jacobins desert their chief, which is not probable. I can endure any thing but the insolent triumph and exultation of these vulgar dogs who have got the day—

Your friends here desire remembrance—

I am, in no haste, to conclude, but fairly for want of other matter, / Your friend

T B Adams

Something more concerning two pair of black-Silk Stockings which I think you or Some of the family must have in possession, belonging to me—I wish you to ask Mother & Betsey Howard, if I did not give them out last Spring to be mended, for unless the fact be so, they are lost—I want my worsted Stockings, which were taken to Quincy for new feet or legs—perhaps both—

I Shall attend to my mothers directions for Mrs: Kirkham. This is a post-script for her—



Index Entries