Adams Papers

From Thomas Boylston Adams to Joseph Pitcairn, 17 October 1800

Philadelphia 17th: October 1800

Dear Sir

After I had closed my letter of yesterday and delivered it at the Coffee house, I received your favor of the 31st: August, accompanied by one from my Brother of the 1st:; both of which came by the Voltaire. I have already acknowledged the receipt of several letters from my brother, which have been forwarded by you; among which were doubtless those, which he was so anxious should reach me; after an interval of several months. I find by the frequency of his recent communications, that the art of writing has not quite deserted him.

I have very little to add in addition to what I wrote yesterday, except to thank you for your valuable letter; the contents of which were very interesting. If you thought my prognostications respecting the probable turn of affairs in this Country, rather higher colored than the reality, what will you think of the complexion of things as detailed in my last letter? I am rather apt to see the dark shades in the prospect before us than the light, cheerful & animating; but then I know not how it can be otherwise, when I am told by my senses & understanding that wicked, ignorant & base-born men; foreigners too to our Country, are superceeding in the public confidence, all the talents, worth & wealth of our oldest and hitherto most honored Citizens. Such facts as these are stubborn things— I must be blind not to see their evil tendency.

New Jersey will turn out federal in their State Legislature, but Maryland strongly otherwise. The Electors in this latter State will be chosen by the people which will give a decided majority of votes for the Anti-federal candidate, there.

We hear that our Commissioners to France have renewed the conferences which were postponed or broken off, for a time. What will they make of this business?

I am dear Sir with much esteem / your friend & hble Serv’t

T B Adams

OCHP: Pitcairn Papers.

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