Adams Papers

From Abigail Smith Adams to William Cranch, 3 February 1800

Febry 3 1800

my dear <Sister> Sir

I received by yesterdays post your kind Letter of Janry 28th. I am the more Solicitious to reply immediatly to it in order to rectify a mistake which mr Shaw must have made, if he said that I had taken up a determination never to go to Washington. so far from it that I know not any thing which would give me more pleasure than visiting that place & many others near it—Mr Shaw may have heard me say, that I did not think of going there the next short Session of Congress, and as circumstances may happen, being obliged to leave it in the month of March, the worst month in the year for travelling. I have never asked the President his intentions, nor shall I advise him either to resign or continue in office. his duty I trust will be pointed out to him and that in so plain a manner that he cannot mistake it. He has never yet in the most perilious of times withdrawn his services from his country. no private consideration of ease profit or pleasure have tempted him to exhange the arduous task assignd him for more than thirty years and altho at his period of Life retirement may be the most desirable to his <p> ease and comfort, yet if his country calls him to continue longer in Her service, I doubt not that he will be obeident to her voice—in which case I certainly should <not> consider it my <[. . .]> duty to accompany him wherever he may be stationd nor have I yet wholy determined not to make even the short visit of next winter, tho I own I am somewhat discouraged from the account of Roads, and from the account of the Presidents House which is represented so <enour> very large and like to be uncomfortably cold—situated from all society, without furniture for what is containd in this House, tis said will be lost in that—into that House the President is determined to go & a part of it I hope may be got ready so as to accommodate him for the Session—

MHi: Adams Papers.

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