Adams Papers

From Cotton Tufts to Abigail Smith Adams, 18 June 1798

Weymouth June. 18. 1798

Dear Madm—

I wrote to the President the 13th. Inst. by Mr. Edmd. Soper who was going to Philadelphia to seek some office in the Land or Sea Service. As there must be a large opening for officers of one Description or another I thought He might be competent to some one or another, tho’ I do not think him prudent enough to be trusted with one that would require much Responsibility respecting Money Matters—

Turner the Stocking Weaver has paid the Debt of Nature and all his other Debts are as I suppose absolv’d.

Billings applied to me this morning for 40 Dollars alledging that he had promisd that Sum; apprehending the ill Consequences of letting him much Money at this Time when his help is greatly wanted, I declined it although as much is due to him. Last November I let him have that Sum. He had not got 3 miles from my House before he was found laying in the Street and for more than a Week He was absent pursuing a Scene of Intemperance that had nearly destroyed him. He was absent a Month in the Winter since when he has been very steady a Day or two excepted— I have paid Mrs. Murray 7 Dollars for the 2 <[. . .]> Sets of the Gleaner, I think you ought to have much good Fruit for that Sum—

How does the President find Time to answer all the Addresses presented to him? It must be a Burden tho in some Respects a pleasant one. In addition to this, the Multitude of Appointments in the Army & Navy besides the Usual Business of Office, must necessarily absorb <[all]> so much of his Time & Attention as I fear will greatly injure his Health—It is necessary for him to have some Relaxation. I hope he rides out <[. . .]>of Town now & then and if the House of Represents would have acted with the same Spirit & Unanimity as seems to appear amongst the People at present, He might before this have made an Excursion to Quincy where I hope to see him shortly—May God preserve his Health of Body, Strength of Mind & Integrity of Heart.—

Our Envoys have tarried too long in France, too long in a corrupted Atmosphere, the enervating Power of which I should rather say beguiling, but few can compleatly resist—Here every Art of Earth & Hell is employed to seduce & corrupt and if not successful in this, to weaken the best formd Resolutions, to [. . .] , flatter, terrify & cajole. I pity our Ministers, hope that the Presidents orders have reachd them and shall rejoice at their Return—


Since the latter End of April the Season has been upon the Extremes either extreme Wet or dry, a dry spell of Weather in the Beginning of May has provd injurious both to Grass and grain, tho We shall have a Sufficiency, yet not that Redundancy that has been expected—It is now dry Weather and has been so for some days—The Clover Field opposite to your House is so ripe that I advised Porter (Yesterday) to cut it—Last Week the Rose Bugs made their Appearance and in some Places are very numerous—They will probably injure much Fruits—

Mrs. Tufts sends Love and beg you to remember us to the President And [Ann] / Yr. Affectionate & H1. St.

Cotton Tufts

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