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Braddock a gift of supplies which the three Delaware counties had furnished for the general’s table as a “small Token of their Regard for him and the Cause in which he is employed.” The supplies consisted of 12 hams, 8 cheeses, two dozen flasks of oil, 10 loaves of sugar, a cask of raisins, a box of spice and currants, a box of pickles and mustard, 8 kegs of biscuit, 4 kegs of sturgeon,...
Partys of the Regt he had orders to Post the Militia after he hd finishd their Tower of duty and retd to Conogochief at any place where the generallity of the People in those parts but more especially Captn Swearing<ham> wd choose as the most convenient for protectg the whole..... . . Swearing<ham>” after the word “parts.” Militia captain Thomas Swearingen lived in northern Frederick...
3[April 1773] (Washington Papers)
Robert Brent (c.1730–1780), the son of George and Catherine Trimming ham Brent, lived at Woodstock on Aquia Creek in Stafford County and owned the quarry at Aquia. Brent had undoubtedly come to see GW about the estate of Brent’s aunt Elizabeth Clifton. Mrs. Clifton had appointed GW one...
4[Diary entry: 21 April 1773] (Washington Papers)
Robert Brent (c.1730–1780), the son of George and Catherine Trimming ham Brent, lived at Woodstock on Aquia Creek in Stafford County and owned the quarry at Aquia. Brent had undoubtedly come to see GW about the estate of Brent’s aunt Elizabeth Clifton. Mrs. Clifton had appointed GW one...
Ham and I (this is against the rules of grammar, but it is consistent with those of modesty and the merits of the man therefore I’ll let it stand) shall set out to morrow morning, for Amboy—by...
6General Orders, 1 April 1779 (Washington Papers)
C. Signs Henly. Ham.
...ten, twenty, thirty, forty and fifty tons burthen are daily going to America, laden with salt and goods, clandestinely sent from England to that island, and in return bring tobacco, indigo, hams, and all sorts of provisions, greatly to the emolument and advantage of the importer. How much the supplying the rebellious Colonies with an article so very material as salt is to their advantage...
Countersign, Hall; Ham.
. The barrel contained hams that Mrs. Washington intended for Adrienne, the marquise (see
...given you the trouble of a second letter by the same ship, had I not forgotten to mention in my last that Mrs Washington had packed & sent for Madame de la Fayette’s acceptance, a barrel of Virginia Hams. I do not know